20 Beautiful Gray Birds with Yellow Bellies [Images + IDs]

gray birds with yellow bellies

Have you ever spotted a bird that’s mostly gray but has a cheerful surprise waiting for you underneath? That’s right; we’re talking about gray birds with bright yellow bellies. These feathered friends are like a burst of sunshine in the avian world, and identifying them can be a delightful challenge.

In this blog post, we’ll venture into the world of gray birds with yellow bellies. We’ll help you discover what makes them so special, where they tend to live, and what they enjoy munching on. So, if you’ve ever come across one of these charming birds and wondered about their identity.

List of 20 Gray Birds with Yellow Bellies

Lesser Goldfinch

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  • Scientific name: Spinus psaltria
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 10-11 centimeters (3.9-4.3 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Lesser Goldfinch is a small songbird found in western North America. It has a black back and cap, contrasting with its bright yellow underparts. The males have black wings with white wing bars, while the females have more subdued grayish-green wings. Lesser Goldfinches are often seen in flocks, feeding on seeds from various plants, especially thistles. They also consume insects during the breeding season. These birds build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs, using grasses, plant fibers, and feathers. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 6 pale bluish-white eggs.

Orange-crowned Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Leiothlypis celata
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small migratory songbird found across North America. Despite its name, it often keeps its orange crown hidden, making it challenging to identify. Its overall plumage is olive green with a yellowish belly. These warblers inhabit various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas. They feed on insects, spiders, and small fruits, foraging actively among tree branches. Orange-crowned Warblers build cup-shaped nests on the ground or in low shrubs, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their song is a simple, sweet trill, adding to the delightful ambiance of the bird’s presence.

Yellow-throated Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga dominica
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Yellow-throated Warbler is a small songbird found in the southeastern United States. It has a striking appearance with its black and white striped head, bright yellow throat, and yellow underparts. Yellow-throated Warblers inhabit mature deciduous and mixed forests, often near water. They forage for insects among tree branches and foliage. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on tree branches, and females lay 3 to 7 eggs clutch. Their song is a series of clear, musical notes that can be heard throughout their forested habitats.

Palm Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga palmarum
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Palm Warbler is a small migratory songbird that breeds in North America and winters in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. It has brownish-olive upperparts and yellow underparts with streaking on the breast. Palm Warblers inhabit a variety of habitats, including forests, thickets, and open areas. They forage on the ground for insects and occasionally berries. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, often hidden in vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a simple, repetitive trill.

Western Kingbird:

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  • Scientific name: Tyrannus verticalis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 19-23 centimeters (7.5-9.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Kingbird is a medium-sized flycatcher found in North and South America. Adult Western Kingbirds have a distinctive appearance with predominantly grayish-brown upperparts and a white belly. They have a black tail with white outer feathers, a black mask through their eyes, and a yellow or orange-yellow belly patch.

These kingbirds are often found in open habitats, including grasslands, agricultural fields, and urban areas. They are known for their aerial foraging behavior, where they capture insects on the wing. They are skilled flycatchers and are often seen perched on exposed branches or wires, making sallies to catch flying insects.

Western Kingbirds are appreciated for their bold and assertive nature. They are known for their aggressive defense of their nests and territory against larger birds and predators. Their distinctive appearance and active behavior make them recognizable and interesting birds to observe.

Common Yellowthroat:

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  • Scientific name: Geothlypis trichas
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-14 centimeters (4.3-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Common Yellowthroat is a small and colorful songbird found in North and Central America. Adult male Common Yellowthroats have a distinctive appearance with a yellow throat and black mask covering their eyes and forehead. They have olive-green upperparts and a white belly.

These warblers are typically found in wetland habitats, including marshes, meadows, and streamside areas. They are known for their skulking behavior in dense vegetation, making them challenging to observe. Their diet primarily consists of insects and other small invertebrates.

Common Yellowthroats are appreciated for their cheerful and repetitive “witchity-witchity-witchity” song, which can often be heard in their habitat. They are also known for their distinctive “chek” calls. Despite their sometimes elusive nature, they are commonly encountered in wetland areas across their range.

Orchard Oriole Female

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  • Scientific name: Icterus spurius
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 16-18 centimeters (6.3-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The female Orchard Oriole is a small migratory bird found in the eastern and central parts of North America. Unlike the bright orange and black plumage of the male, the female has more subdued colors. She displays olive-green upperparts, yellowish underparts, and a grayish head. Orchard Orioles inhabit various habitats, including woodlands, orchards, and suburban areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in tree canopies. The female builds a tightly woven hanging nest in trees, and she lays a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. While her song is less elaborate than the male’s, she still contributes a soft, pleasant warbling to the chorus of bird songs.

Yellow-breasted Chat

  • Scientific name: Icteria virens
  • Lifespan: Typically 5-10 years
  • Size: Medium-sized; about 5.5-7.5 inches (14-19 cm) in length, wingspan of 7.5-9.5 inches (19-24 cm)
  • Origin: Native to North America, found in thickets and shrubby habitats.

The Yellow-breasted Chat is a large and colorful songbird found in North America. Adult Yellow-breasted Chats have a striking appearance with bright yellow plumage on their throat and breast. They have olive-green upperparts and a white belly. Their eyes are surrounded by a bold white eye ring.

These chats are often found in dense thickets, shrubby habitats, and wetland edges. They are known for their varied and complex songs, which include a combination of whistles, squawks, and mimicry of other bird species’ calls. They are often heard before they are seen, as they can be elusive in thick vegetation.

Yellow-breasted Chats are appreciated for their unique vocalizations and vibrant plumage. They are skilled at imitating the sounds of other birds and are sometimes referred to as the “song mimic of the West.” Despite their somewhat secretive behavior, their distinctive songs and bright colors make them intriguing and sought-after birds for birdwatchers.

Canada Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Cardellina canadensis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Canada Warbler is a small and colorful songbird that breeds in North America and migrates to South America during the winter months. Adult Canada Warblers have a distinctive appearance with bright yellow underparts, a gray-blue upper body, and a bold necklace of black streaks across their yellow breast. They also have a white eye ring and a striking white “spectacles” pattern around their eyes.

During the breeding season, these warblers are often found in dense, moist forests with plenty of undergrowth, including coniferous and mixed woodlands. They primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Canada Warblers are appreciated for their unique appearance and their melodious and bubbly songs, which they use to defend their territories and attract mates. They are often found foraging in shrubs and low vegetation, making them a delightful sight for birdwatchers in their breeding habitats.

Pine Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga pinus
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-15 centimeters (4.3-5.9 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Pine Warbler is a small and adaptable songbird found in eastern North America. Adult Pine Warblers have a predominantly olive-green plumage with a yellowish wash on their underparts. They have white wing bars and a distinctive yellow patch on their throat and face.

These warblers are often found in a variety of coniferous and mixed woodlands, including pine forests, where they forage for insects, spiders, and seeds. They are also known to visit bird feeders, especially during the winter months when food can be scarce.

Pine Warblers are appreciated for their cheerful songs, which are often described as musical and trill-like. Their song is a common sound in pine forests during the breeding season, and they are known for their adaptability to different forested habitats.

Magnolia Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga magnolia
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Magnolia Warbler is a small and colorful songbird found in North America, particularly in the northern United States and parts of Canada during the breeding season. Adult Magnolia Warblers have a striking appearance with bright yellow underparts, a black streak through their eyes, and a bold necklace of black streaks across their yellow breast. They also have a white belly and wings with white wing bars.

These warblers are often found in a variety of habitats, including deciduous and mixed woodlands, especially in the northern boreal forests. They primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Magnolia Warblers are appreciated for their distinctive appearance and their melodious songs, which include a series of musical notes and trills. They are often encountered in the upper canopy of trees, making them a sought-after species for birdwatchers during the breeding season.

Nashville Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Leiothlypis ruficapilla
  • Lifespan: 4-8 years
  • Size: 10-12 centimeters (3.9-4.7 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Nashville Warbler is a small and vibrant songbird that breeds in North America and migrates to Central America and the Caribbean during the winter months. Adult Nashville Warblers have a striking appearance with bright yellow underparts, a gray head, and a distinctive white eye ring. They also have a rusty-red cap on their heads, which gives them their name.

During the breeding season, these warblers are often found in coniferous and mixed woodlands with dense undergrowth, especially in the northern parts of their range. They primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Nashville Warblers are appreciated for their colorful plumage and their cheerful and rapid songs, which consist of a series of high-pitched and buzzy notes. They are agile foragers, often gleaning insects from leaves and branches. They are a delightful sight for birdwatchers in their breeding habitats.

MacGillivray’s Warbler

  • Scientific name: Geothlypis tolmiei
  • Lifespan: Typically 3 to 6 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 16 to 20 cm (6.3 to 7.9 inches)
  • Native to: Western North America

MacGillivray’s Warbler is a small and secretive songbird found in western North America. Adult MacGillivray’s Warblers have a subtle yet distinctive appearance with olive-green upperparts, a gray head, and a yellow throat. They also have a distinctive white eye ring and a black streak through their eyes.

These warblers are often found in dense shrubby habitats, including chaparral, montane forests, and thickets. They primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

MacGillivray’s Warblers are appreciated for their elusive behavior and their unique songs, which are often described as a series of musical phrases. They are often heard before they are seen, as they forage in dense vegetation. Their habitat preferences and vocalizations make them a rewarding challenge for birdwatchers in the western parts of North America.

Cassin’s Kingbird

  • Scientific name: Tyrannus vociferans
  • Lifespan: About 7 to 10 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 30 to 34 cm (11.8 to 13.4 inches)
  • Native to: Western North America

Cassin’s Kingbird is a medium-sized flycatcher found in western North America. Adult Cassin’s Kingbirds have a bold appearance with predominantly grayish-brown upperparts, a pale belly, and a distinctive white throat and breast. They also have a conspicuous black mask through their eyes and a white tip on their tail.

These kingbirds are often found in a variety of open habitats, including grasslands, woodlands, and riparian areas. They are known for their aerial foraging behavior, where they capture flying insects on the wing. They are skilled flycatchers and are often seen perched on exposed branches or wires.

Cassin’s Kingbirds are appreciated for their bold and assertive nature, as they are known to aggressively defend their territories against larger birds and predators. They are recognized for their loud and melodious calls, making them recognizable and interesting birds to observe in their western North American habitats.

Couch’s Kingbird

  • Scientific name: Tyrannus couchii
  • Lifespan: Typically around 3 to 5 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 30 to 34 cm (11.8 to 13.4 inches)
  • Native to: Southwestern United States, Mexico, and parts of Central America.

Couch’s Kingbird is a large and vibrant kingbird species found in parts of North and Central America, primarily in Mexico and Central America, although it occasionally ventures into southern Texas. Adult Couch’s Kingbirds have a striking appearance with bright lemon-yellow underparts and a darker olive-green upper body. They also have a white throat and a distinct white band on their tail, which is visible in flight.

These kingbirds are often found in a variety of open habitats, including savannas, farmlands, and woodlands, and they are known for their aerial foraging behavior, capturing insects and other prey on the wing.

Couch’s Kingbirds are appreciated for their bold and assertive nature, as they are known to defend their territories aggressively. They are also recognized for their melodious calls and loud, chattering vocalizations, making them an intriguing and colorful addition to their habitat.

Tropical Kingbird

  • Scientific name: Tyrannus melancholicus
  • Lifespan: About 3 to 7 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 28 to 32 cm (11 to 12.6 inches)
  • Native to: The Americas, from the southern United States to South America.

The Tropical Kingbird is a medium-sized flycatcher found in parts of North, Central, and South America. Despite its name, it can be found well beyond the tropics, including parts of the southern United States. Adult Tropical Kingbirds have an understated appearance with olive-brown upperparts and a pale yellow belly. They have a white throat and a distinctive white outer tail, which is visible in flight.

These kingbirds are often found in various open habitats, including gardens, parks, and woodland edges, where they forage for insects and other prey.

Tropical Kingbirds are appreciated for their insect-catching prowess, and they are often seen perched on exposed branches or wires, making sallies to capture flying insects. They are known for their distinctive calls, which include a series of loud, sharp notes. They are a familiar and adaptable species in their range.

American Redstart (Female)

  • Scientific name: Setophaga ruticilla
  • Lifespan: Typically around 3 to 5 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 19 to 22 cm (7.5 to 8.7 inches)
  • Native to: North and Central America

The American Redstart is a small and vibrant warbler found in North and Central America. While the male American Redstart is known for its striking black and orange plumage, the female has a more understated appearance. Female American Redstarts have predominantly grayish-olive upperparts and a pale yellow belly and throat. They lack the striking black and orange colors of the males.

These warblers are often found in a variety of habitats, including deciduous forests, woodlands, and riparian areas. They primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates.

Female American Redstarts are appreciated for their association with their more colorful male counterparts and their important role in breeding and raising their young. They are active and agile foragers, often seen flitting among branches and foliage while hunting for insects.

Great Crested Flycatcher

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  • Scientific name: Myiarchus crinitus
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 17-21 centimeters (6.7-8.3 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Great Crested Flycatcher is a medium-sized flycatcher found in parts of North and Central America. Adult Great Crested Flycatchers have a distinctive appearance with bright lemon-yellow bellies and grayish-olive upperparts. They have a prominent rusty-orange tail, which is often hidden but can be flashed in flight or when displaying.

These flycatchers are often found in woodlands, forests, and suburban areas. They primarily feed on insects, including flying insects like bees and wasps, which they catch in mid-air.

Great Crested Flycatchers are appreciated for their striking colors and their distinctive calls, which include loud, descending whistles and chattering notes. They are known for their habit of nesting in cavities, including natural tree cavities and birdhouses. Their striking plumage and vocalizations make them a notable species in their habitat.

Western Meadowlark

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  • Scientific name: Sturnella neglecta
  • Lifespan: Up to 6 years
  • Size: 20-28 centimeters (7.9-11 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Meadowlark is a medium-sized songbird found in western North America. It has a striking appearance, with its bright yellow underparts, brownish upperparts, and a bold black V-shaped pattern on its chest. The Western Meadowlark is known for its beautiful and melodic song, which consists of a series of flute-like notes. It inhabits grasslands, prairies, and agricultural fields, foraging on the ground for insects, seeds, and occasionally small vertebrates. These birds build cup-shaped nests in tall grasses, and females lay 3 to 6 eggs clutch. They are often considered a symbol of the American West.

Lesser Goldfinch

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  • Scientific name: Spinus psaltria
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 10-11 centimeters (3.9-4.3 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Lesser Goldfinch is a small songbird found in western North America. It has a black back and cap, contrasting with its bright yellow underparts. The males have black wings with white wing bars, while the females have more subdued grayish-green wings. Lesser Goldfinches are often seen in flocks, feeding on seeds from various plants, especially thistles. They also consume insects during the breeding season. These birds build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs, using grasses, plant fibers, and feathers. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 6 pale bluish-white eggs.

Orange-crowned Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Leiothlypis celata
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small migratory songbird found across North America. Despite its name, it often keeps its orange crown hidden, making it challenging to identify. Its overall plumage is olive green with a yellowish belly. These warblers inhabit various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas. They feed on insects, spiders, and small fruits, foraging actively among tree branches. Orange-crowned Warblers build cup-shaped nests on the ground or in low shrubs, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their song is a simple, sweet trill, adding to the delightful ambiance of the bird’s presence.

Orchard Oriole Female

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  • Scientific name: Icterus spurius
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 16-18 centimeters (6.3-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The female Orchard Oriole is a small migratory bird found in the eastern and central parts of North America. Unlike the bright orange and black plumage of the male, the female has more subdued colors. She displays olive-green upperparts, yellowish underparts, and a grayish head. Orchard Orioles inhabit various habitats, including woodlands, orchards, and suburban areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in tree canopies. The female builds a tightly woven hanging nest in trees, and she lays a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. While her song is less elaborate than the male’s, she still contributes a soft, pleasant warbling to the chorus of bird songs.

Yellow-throated Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga dominica
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Yellow-throated Warbler is a small songbird found in the southeastern United States. It has a striking appearance with its black and white striped head, bright yellow throat, and yellow underparts. Yellow-throated Warblers inhabit mature deciduous and mixed forests, often near water. They forage for insects among tree branches and foliage. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on tree branches, and females lay 3 to 7 eggs clutch. Their song is a series of clear, musical notes that can be heard throughout their forested habitats.

Palm Warbler

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga palmarum
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Palm Warbler is a small migratory songbird that breeds in North America and winters in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. It has brownish-olive upperparts and yellow underparts with streaking on the breast. Palm Warblers inhabit a variety of habitats, including forests, thickets, and open areas. They forage on the ground for insects and occasionally berries. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, often hidden in vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a simple, repetitive trill.

Final Thoughts on Gray Birds with Yellow Bellies

As we conclude our journey, we’ve uncovered the hidden treasures among gray birds with yellow bellies. These birds, with their subdued gray plumage and striking yellow underparts, remind us that beauty often lies in unexpected places.

We’ve not only celebrated their unique appearances but also gained insights into their habitats, behaviors, and dietary preferences. These birds are an integral part of the intricate tapestry of life in North America.

Further Readings

List of Gray Birds with Yellow Bellies

  • Western Kingbird
  • Common Yellowthroat
  • Yellow-breasted Chat
  • Canada Warbler
  • Pine Warbler
  • Magnolia Warbler
  • Nashville Warbler
  • MacGillivray’s Warbler
  • Cassin’s Kingbird
  • Couch’s Kingbird
  • Tropical Kingbird
  • American Redstart (female)
  • Great Crested Flycatcher
  • Western Meadowlark
  • Lesser Goldfinch
  • Orange-crowned Warbler
  • Orchard Oriole Female
  • Yellow-throated Warbler
  • Palm Warbler
I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends.Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all.Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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