How to Keep Squirrels Out of Bird Feeders | Actionable Strategies

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Feeding birds in your backyard may be a lot of fun, but if a squirrel keeps turning up to take all the bird food, it can become annoying. Fortunately, there are many of strategies to prevent these cunning creatures from using your bird feeder.

In order to ensure that the birdseed remains available for the birds, we’ll explain below how to prevent squirrels from using bird feeders.

The following is how to prevent squirrels from using bird feeders:

Install a bird feeder pole that is squirrel-proof.

Investing in a bird feeder pole is one of the easiest methods to keep squirrels away from your bird food. The only seed a squirrel can get if it can’t climb to your bird feeder is what’s on the ground.

You may install your own baffles to whatever pole you like, or poles that already have them are an excellent alternative. Poles are difficult to climb, and a baffle only provides more security.

Keep feeders away from tree branches

Ever saw a squirrel jump? They can go further than you would think. Hang the feeder on a string between two trees if you want to keep squirrels out of your yard.

Squirrels will find it difficult to navigate the bounce of the string, which will decrease their chances of reaching the seed. Just make sure the trees you choose are sufficiently far apart to prevent squirrels from jumping straight to the feeder you use.

Upgrade Your Bird Feeder with a Cage

Putting a wire cage on the bird feeder is an additional way to deter squirrels. Smaller birds can still eat through the openings in the wire, but squirrels won’t be able to squeeze through.

Additionally, this may deter big bully birds like grackles, starlings, and pigeons. Just make sure the birds you want to feed can fit through the openings in between the wires.

Take Note of the Feeder’s Location

You should use caution when deciding where to put bird feeders in order to dissuade squirrels from using them. The feeder should always be placed at least ten feet away from any trees, porches, gutters, roofs, or other structures that squirrels may use to leap from in order to get to the food. This will guarantee that birds, rather than squirrels, get to the food in the majority.

Maintain a tidy and clean environment around the feeder

Even while it’s not feasible to keep all of the birdseed off the ground at all times, you shouldn’t often leave a mess underneath the feeder. Spilled seed under the feeder might attract squirrels and alert them to the presence of more food. Since birds won’t be consuming rotting and stale seed that might make them ill, this is also beneficial generally.

Add Baffles to the Bird Feeder’s Base

We noted that baffles are a feature on certain squirrel-proof poles, but you may install them yourself if you like. You may install a baffle above or below the feeder, made of plastic or metal.

To deter squirrels, the ideal baffles to use are those that are around 15 to 18 inches broad. When a squirrel climbs on most baffles, it may throw them off balance and keep the food out of reach by causing them to tilt or twist.

7. Use the feeder wire to suspend spinners.

Consider adding spinners made of small pipe lengths, thread spools, or plastic bottles if your feeder is suspended from a wire. By moving and spinning on the wire, these objects may deter squirrels from reaching the feeder.

A whirling object on the rope will eventually tip over, and the squirrel will probably fall as a result. This will not only deter squirrels, but it may also be entertaining to observe.

Bird feeders that are squirrel-proof

If you’re looking to replace your feeder, consider getting one designed to keep squirrels out. A lot of them feature doors and hatches that shut when a squirrel’s weight passes through them.

Lighter birds won’t cause the hatch, thus eating won’t be an issue for them. There are several of options available for squirrel-proof feeders on the market. Some have squirrel weight attached to them, while others don’t provide enough room for squirrels to sit and eat.

Select the Proper Type of Birdseed

Safflower and Nyjer seeds are the only kinds of birdseed that squirrels will not happily consume. The squirrels will not be interested in consuming these two seeds since they taste harsh.

Additionally, there are seeds that are covered with spicy pepper, which squirrels will avoid but birds would gladly consume. Additionally, squirrels are less likely to consume little seed than huge kernels.

Take Into Account Feeding the Squirrels in Their Own Area

While other individuals have no problem feeding the squirrels personally, they prefer to do it in a location away from where the attractive birds will be dining. In this situation, you may want to set up a little eating place for squirrels away from the bird feeders.

Squirrels will still sometimes get into the birdseed, but much less often. This may sound like an odd recommendation, but it really does work!

Contemplate Including a Slinky in Your Bird Feeding Stick

A cheap toy that many people remember from their youth is the Slinky. If you don’t already have one, you can get one for a few bucks, and it can deter squirrels from coming near the bird feeders.

The Slinky should be fastened to the top of the bird feeder’s pole, where it swings down towards the ground. Any squirrels that try to leap aboard or climb the pole will be thrown to the ground.

Final Thoughts

Remember that squirrels are an integral part of nature, much like the cardinals, finches, and blue jays you enjoy watching in your garden. Although there are several strategies to deter squirrels from using bird feeders, most bird feeders will nevertheless sometimes be targeted by a cunning squirrel.

All these ideas will do is make sure that occurs less often, allowing the birds to enjoy your pricey birdfeed.

I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends.Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all.Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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