38 Astonishing Birds with Yellow bellies [Images + IDs]

Birds with a Yellow bellies

Birds with yellow bellies are some of the most striking and colorful birds in the world. Yellow is a vibrant and cheerful color that adds a touch of sunshine to any landscape. From warblers to finches, there are many different species of birds with yellow bellies. In this blog post, we’ll explore some of the most beautiful and fascinating birds with yellow bellies, and learn more about their unique characteristics and habitats. Whether you’re a bird enthusiast or just appreciate the beauty of nature, these birds are sure to capture your heart and imagination. So let’s dive in and discover some of the most amazing birds with yellow bellies in the world!

List of Birds with Yellow Bellies

American Goldfinch:

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  • Scientific name: Spinus tristis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-14 centimeters (4.3-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) is a small, vibrant bird found throughout North America. During the breeding season, the males display bright yellow plumage with black wings and a black cap. The females have a more muted yellow coloration. They are often seen feeding on seeds, especially from thistles and other plants, and are known for their distinctive undulating flight pattern. American Goldfinches breed later in the summer compared to other birds, taking advantage of the abundance of seeds. Their nests are built in shrubs or trees, and they typically lay a clutch of 4 to 6 pale blue eggs.

Common Yellowthroat:

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  • Scientific name: Geothlypis trichas
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-14 centimeters (4.3-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) is a small migratory bird that inhabits wetlands, marshes, and thickets throughout North America. The males have striking yellow throats and breasts, while the females are more subtly colored with olive-brown plumage. These warblers are known for their distinctive “witchety-witchety-witchety” song, often heard from the dense vegetation where they forage for insects and spiders. Common Yellowthroats construct cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, hidden in tall grasses or low shrubs. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs, which they incubate for about two weeks.

Western Meadowlark:

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  • Scientific name: Sturnella neglecta
  • Lifespan: Up to 6 years
  • Size: 20-28 centimeters (7.9-11 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) is a medium-sized songbird found in western North America. It has a striking appearance, with its bright yellow underparts, brownish upperparts, and a bold black V-shaped pattern on its chest. The Western Meadowlark is known for its beautiful and melodic song, which consists of a series of flute-like notes. It inhabits grasslands, prairies, and agricultural fields, foraging on the ground for insects, seeds, and occasionally small vertebrates. These birds build cup-shaped nests in tall grasses, and females lay 3 to 6 eggs clutch. They are often considered a symbol of the American West.

Lesser Goldfinch:

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  • Scientific name: Spinus psaltria
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 10-11 centimeters (3.9-4.3 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Lesser Goldfinch (Spinus psaltria) is a small songbird found in western North America. It has a black back and cap, contrasting with its bright yellow underparts. The males have black wings with white wing bars, while the females have more subdued grayish-green wings. Lesser Goldfinches are often seen in flocks, feeding on seeds from various plants, especially thistles. They also consume insects during the breeding season. These birds build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs, using grasses, plant fibers, and feathers. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 6 pale bluish-white eggs.

Prairie Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga discolor
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Prairie Warbler (Setophaga discolor) is a small migratory bird that breeds in eastern and central North America. It has bright yellow underparts with streaks of black, a black patch on its cheek, and olive-green upperparts. These warblers are commonly found in grasslands, shrubby areas, and open woods. They feed on insects, foraging actively among vegetation and sometimes hovering to catch their prey. Prairie Warblers build cup-shaped nests close to the ground, often hidden in low shrubs or grasses. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 white eggs with brown speckles. The males have a distinctive buzzy song, often described as a “zee-zee-zee-zo-zee.”

Orange-crowned Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Leiothlypis celata
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Orange-crowned Warbler (Leiothlypis celata) is a small migratory songbird found across North America. Despite its name, it often keeps its orange crown hidden, making it challenging to identify. Its overall plumage is olive-green with a yellowish belly. These warblers inhabit various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas. They feed on insects, spiders, and small fruits, foraging actively among tree branches. Orange-crowned Warblers build cup-shaped nests on the ground or in low shrubs, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their song is a simple, sweet trill, adding to the delightful ambiance of the bird’s presence.

Prothonotary Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Protonotaria citrea
  • Lifespan: 3-7 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) is a vibrant songbird found in the eastern United States and parts of Canada. It stands out with its bright yellow plumage, olive-green back, and a distinct blue-gray head. These warblers prefer wet habitats, such as swamps, marshes, and riverbanks. They forage for insects and spiders by hopping along branches or probing the foliage. Prothonotary Warblers build their nests in tree cavities near water, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 7 eggs. Their song is a series of rich, ringing notes that can be heard echoing through their wooded habitats.

Orchard Oriole Female:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus spurius
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 16-18 centimeters (6.3-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The female Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) is a small migratory bird found in the eastern and central parts of North America. Unlike the bright orange and black plumage of the male, the female has more subdued colors. She displays olive-green upperparts, yellowish underparts, and a grayish head. Orchard Orioles inhabit various habitats, including woodlands, orchards, and suburban areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in tree canopies. The female builds a tightly woven hanging nest in trees, and she lays a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. While her song is less elaborate than the male’s, she still contributes a soft, pleasant warbling to the chorus of bird songs.

Western Tanager:

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  • Scientific name: Piranga ludoviciana
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 16-18 centimeters (6.3-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) is a stunning migratory bird found in western North America. The male has a bright yellow body, a black back, and striking red-orange plumage on its head and neck. The female is more subdued, with olive-yellow plumage and grayish wings. These tanagers inhabit coniferous forests and mountainous regions. They forage for insects, spiders, and fruits, often perching high in trees or fluttering after flying insects. Western Tanagers build cup-shaped nests in trees, and females lay 3 to 5 bluish-green eggs clutch. Their song is a series of melodic, warbling notes that can be heard echoing through the forest.

Canada Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Cardellina canadensis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Canada Warbler (Cardellina canadensis) is a small migratory songbird found in the boreal forests of North America. It has a distinct appearance with its bright yellow underparts, gray upperparts, and a prominent necklace of black streaks on its chest. These warblers prefer moist habitats, including wetlands and forest understory. They forage for insects, spiders, and small fruits by hopping along the ground or low branches. Canada Warblers build cup-shaped nests on the ground, often hidden among moss or leaf litter, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a series of clear, whistling notes that contribute to the tranquil ambiance of their woodland homes.

Cape May Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga tigrina
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Cape May Warbler (Setophaga tigrina) is a small migratory songbird that breeds in the boreal forests of North America. During the breeding season, males display a striking appearance with their vibrant yellow plumage, black streaks on the sides, and a rusty patch on the cheek. Females and nonbreeding males have a more subdued appearance. Cape May Warblers primarily feed on insects and spiders, often foraging at the outer tips of tree branches. They build cup-shaped nests in coniferous trees, and females lay 4 to 7 eggs clutch. Their song is a series of high, thin notes mixed with trills.

Magnolia Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga magnolia
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-13 centimeters (4.3-5.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) is a small migratory songbird found in North America. It has a distinctive appearance with its bright yellow underparts, gray upperparts, and black streaks on its sides and back. During the breeding season, males also display a black mask on their face. These warblers breed in boreal forests and coniferous habitats, foraging for insects and spiders among tree branches. They build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, often hidden in dense vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a musical series of high, rolling notes.

Pine Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga pinus
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 11-15 centimeters (4.3-5.9 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Pine Warbler (Setophaga pinus) is a small songbird found in eastern North America. It has a primarily olive-green plumage with a touch of yellow on its underparts. Pine Warblers inhabit coniferous forests, pine plantations, and mixed woodlands. They feed mainly on insects, including pine cone seeds and berries. These warblers build cup-shaped nests in pine trees, usually high above the ground, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a musical trill that is often described as a “zee-zee-zee-zoo-zee.”

Yellow Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga petechia
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 10-12 centimeters (3.9-4.7 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) is a small migratory songbird found throughout North America. Males have vibrant yellow plumage with reddish streaks on the chest, while females and nonbreeding males have a more subdued appearance. Yellow Warblers inhabit a variety of habitats, including woodlands, shrubby areas, and wetlands. They forage for insects and spiders among tree branches and foliage. These warblers build cup-shaped nests in shrubs or trees, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a series of sweet, high-pitched notes that can be heard throughout their habitats.

Orchard Oriole Female:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus spurius
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 16-18 centimeters (6.3-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The female Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) is a small migratory bird found in the eastern and central parts of North America. Unlike the bright orange and black plumage of the male, the female has more subdued colors. She displays olive-green upperparts, yellowish underparts, and a grayish head. Orchard Orioles inhabit various habitats, including woodlands, orchards, and suburban areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in tree canopies. The female builds a tightly woven hanging nest in trees, and she lays a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. While her song is less elaborate than the male’s, she still contributes a soft, pleasant warbling to the chorus of bird songs.

Western Kingbird:

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  • Scientific name: Tyrannus verticalis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 19-23 centimeters (7.5-9.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Kingbird (Tyrannus verticalis) is a medium-sized songbird found in western North America. It has a bold appearance with its grayish-olive upperparts, yellow underparts, and a prominent white throat. Western Kingbirds inhabit open habitats such as grasslands, meadows, and agricultural areas. They feed primarily on insects, often catching them in mid-air or from perches. These kingbirds build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. They are known for their assertive behavior, often defending their territories from intruders with their distinctive “kip” call.

Baltimore Oriole Female:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus galbula
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 17-18 centimeters (6.7-7.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The female Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) is a migratory bird found in eastern and central North America. While the male sports vibrant orange and black plumage, the female has more subdued colors. She displays a yellowish-brown head and back, with a yellow-orange breast. Baltimore Orioles inhabit various habitats, including woodlands, parks, and suburban areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in tree canopies. The female builds a tightly woven hanging nest in trees, and she lays a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. Her song is a series of soft, flute-like whistles that contribute to the melodious atmosphere of their habitat.

Altamira Oriole:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus gularis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 24-28 centimeters (9.4-11 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Altamira Oriole (Icterus gularis) is a striking songbird found in southern Texas and parts of Mexico. It has a vibrant orange plumage with black wings, a black tail, and a black throat patch. Altamira Orioles inhabit open woodlands, riversides, and semi-arid regions. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in the upper canopy of trees. These orioles build pendulous nests in trees, which can be as large as a basketball. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a series of rich, flute-like notes that resonate through their habitat.

Audubon’s Oriole:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus graduacauda
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 19-22 centimeters (7.5-8.7 inches)
  • Origin: North America

Audubon’s Oriole (Icterus graduacauda) is a medium-sized songbird found in parts of Texas and Mexico. It has a striking appearance with its black head, back, and throat, contrasting with its bright yellow underparts and rump. Audubon’s Orioles inhabit woodlands, thickets, and riparian areas. They feed on insects, fruits, and nectar, often foraging in the upper parts of trees. These orioles build a pendant nest in trees, which hangs like a bag from a branch. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 4 eggs. Their song is a series of rich, flute-like notes that contribute to the vibrant soundscape of their habitat.

Eastern Meadowlark:

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  • Scientific name: Sturnella magna
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 20-28 centimeters (7.9-11 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna) is a medium-sized songbird found in eastern North America. It has a striking appearance with its bright yellow underparts, brownish upperparts, and a bold black V-shaped pattern on its chest. Eastern Meadowlarks inhabit grasslands, meadows, and agricultural fields. They forage on the ground for insects, seeds, and occasionally small vertebrates. These meadowlarks build cup-shaped nests on the ground, hidden in tall grasses or low shrubs. Females lay a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. They are known for their melodious and flute-like song, often described as a clear, liquid whistle that adds to the enchanting ambiance of their habitat.

Yellow-throated Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga dominica
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Yellow-throated Warbler (Setophaga dominica) is a small songbird found in the southeastern United States. It has a striking appearance with its black and white striped head, bright yellow throat, and yellow underparts. Yellow-throated Warblers inhabit mature deciduous and mixed forests, often near water. They forage for insects among tree branches and foliage. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on tree branches, and females lay 3 to 7 eggs clutch. Their song is a series of clear, musical notes that can be heard throughout their forested habitats.

Nashville Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Leiothlypis ruficapilla
  • Lifespan: 4-8 years
  • Size: 10-12 centimeters (3.9-4.7 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Nashville Warbler (Leiothlypis ruficapilla) is a small migratory songbird found in North America. It has a primarily olive-green plumage with a yellow throat and a distinctive gray head and crown. Nashville Warblers breed in boreal forests and coniferous habitats, foraging for insects and spiders among tree branches. They build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, hidden in dense vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a rapid series of high-pitched notes that resembles the sound “tsee-tsee-tsee-tsee.”

Palm Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga palmarum
  • Lifespan: 4-7 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) is a small migratory songbird that breeds in North America and winters in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. It has brownish-olive upperparts and yellow underparts with streaking on the breast. Palm Warblers inhabit a variety of habitats, including forests, thickets, and open areas. They forage on the ground for insects and occasionally berries. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, often hidden in vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs. Their song is a simple, repetitive trill.

Cedar Waxwing

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Bombycilla cedrorum
  • Lifespan: about 8 years
  • Size: 6-8 inches
  • Native to: Northern half of the United States

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a medium-sized songbird found in North America. It has a sleek grayish-brown plumage with a prominent crest, black mask, and distinctive red wax-like tips on its wing feathers. Cedar Waxwings inhabit woodlands, orchards, and urban areas. They primarily feed on fruits, especially berries, and occasionally insects. These waxwings build cup-shaped nests in trees, usually hidden in dense foliage, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a high-pitched, thin whistle that is often heard during their flock-like movements.

Evening Grosbeak:

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  • Scientific name: Coccothraustes vespertinus
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Size: 16-19 centimeters (6.3-7.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) is a medium-sized songbird found in North America. It has a robust body with a thick, conical bill and a striking plumage. Males have a yellow forehead, black wings with white patches, and a brownish back. Females have similar patterns but with more subdued colors. Evening Grosbeaks inhabit coniferous forests and feed on seeds, buds, and fruits. They build cup-shaped nests in trees, and females lay a clutch of 2 to 4 eggs. Their song is a series of short, clear whistled notes that vary in pitch.

Scott’s Oriole:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus parisorum
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 19-23 centimeters (7.5-9.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

Scott’s Oriole (Icterus parisorum) is a vibrant songbird native to the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico. It has a striking appearance with its black head and throat, bright yellow underparts, and bold white wing patches. Scott’s Orioles inhabit arid and semi-arid habitats, including deserts, canyons, and scrublands. They feed on insects, nectar, and fruits, often foraging in the upper canopy of trees. These orioles build pendant nests in trees or cacti, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a melodic and flutelike series of whistles and trills that resonate through their desert habitats.

Spot-breasted Oriole:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus pectoralis
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 20-22 centimeters (7.9-8.7 inches)
  • Origin: Central America and the Caribbean

The Spot-breasted Oriole (Icterus pectoralis) is a colorful songbird in Central America and parts of southern Mexico. It has a distinctive appearance with its bright yellow underparts, black head, and upperparts, and a prominent spot of orange on its breast. Spot-breasted Orioles inhabit various habitats, including forests, plantations, and gardens. They feed on fruits, nectar, and insects, often foraging in the upper parts of trees. These orioles build pendant nests in trees, usually near the tips of branches, and females lay a clutch of 2 to 4 eggs. Their song is a series of rich, melodious whistles and trills.

Streak-backed Oriole Female:

  • Scientific name: Icterus pustulatus
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 20-23 centimeters (7.9-9.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Streak-backed Oriole (Icterus pustulatus) is a songbird found in Mexico and the southwestern United States. The female has a subtle yet elegant appearance, with grayish-brown upperparts, streaked underparts, and a yellowish throat. Streak-backed Orioles inhabit arid and semi-arid habitats, including deserts, scrublands, and canyons. They feed on insects, nectar, and fruits, often foraging in the upper parts of trees. These orioles build pendant nests in trees or cacti, and females lay a clutch of 2 to 4 eggs. Their song is a series of rich and flutelike whistles that add to the unique soundscape of their arid habitats.

Hooded Oriole:

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  • Scientific name: Icterus cucullatus
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 19-23 centimeters (7.5-9.1 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Hooded Oriole (Icterus cucullatus) is a brightly colored songbird found in western North America. The male displays a vibrant yellow plumage with a black face, throat, and bib-like hood. The female has more subdued colors, with a yellowish-brown head and back. Hooded Orioles inhabit a range of habitats, including woodlands, riparian areas, and suburban gardens. They feed on insects, nectar, and fruits, often foraging in tree canopies. These orioles build pendant nests in trees, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a series of melodious, flute-like notes that contribute to the lively atmosphere of their habitats.

Wilson’s Warbler

  • Scientific name: Cardellina pusilla
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Size: 3.9 to 4.7 in
  • Native to: Northern Canada and the western US

The Wilson’s Warbler (Cardellina pusilla) is a small songbird found in North America. It has bright yellow plumage, a black cap, and a small black patch around its eye. Wilson’s Warblers breed in the western parts of North America and migrate to Central America and the Caribbean for the winter. They inhabit forests, thickets, and shrubby areas. These warblers feed on insects, spiders, and berries, often foraging in low vegetation and shrubs. They build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, hidden in dense vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their song is a rapid, high-pitched trill.

Hooded Warbler:

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  • Scientific name: Setophaga citrina
  • Lifespan: 5-9 years
  • Size: 12-14 centimeters (4.7-5.5 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Hooded Warbler (Setophaga citrina) is a small migratory songbird found in eastern North America. It has a black hood and throat, bright yellow underparts, and olive-green upperparts. Hooded Warblers inhabit deciduous forests, thickets, and streamside habitats. They feed on insects and spiders, foraging in the understory and lower branches of trees. These warblers build cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, hidden in dense vegetation, and females lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their song is a series of rich, musical notes that form a distinctive “witchety-witchety-witchety” sound.

Williamson’s Sapsucker Male:

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  • Scientific name: Sphyrapicus thyroideus
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Size: 21-24 centimeters (8.3-9.4 inches)
  • Origin: North America

Williamson’s Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus thyroideus) is a medium-sized woodpecker found in western North America. The male has striking plumage with a black head, yellow belly, and white wing patches. Williamson’s Sapsuckers inhabit coniferous forests and montane habitats. They feed on tree sap, insects, and berries, often creating distinctive sap wells on trees. These sapsuckers excavate cavity nests in dead or dying trees, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their call is a series of short, high-pitched notes.

Great Crested Flycatcher:

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  • Scientific name: Myiarchus crinitus
  • Lifespan: 6-10 years
  • Size: 17-21 centimeters (6.7-8.3 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) is a large songbird found in eastern North America. It has a yellow belly, olive-green upperparts, and a prominent crest on its head. Great Crested Flycatchers inhabit woodlands, forests, and orchards. They feed on insects, catching them in mid-air or from tree branches. These flycatchers build cup-shaped nests in tree cavities, often reusing old woodpecker nests, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 7 eggs. Their call is a loud, sharp “whreeep” or “whee-eep” that echoes through their woodland habitats.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker:

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  • Scientific name: Sphyrapicus varius
  • Lifespan: 6-8 years
  • Size: 19-22 centimeters (7.5-8.7 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. It has black and white plumage, a red cap, and a yellowish belly. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers inhabit forests, woodlands, and edges near water. They feed on tree sap, insects, and berries, often creating characteristic rows of sap wells on trees. These sapsuckers excavate cavity nests in dead or dying trees, and females lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their call is a distinct, high-pitched “mew” or “mew-wew” sound.

Final Thoughts on Birds With Yellow Bellies

Birds with yellow bellies add a vibrant and cheerful touch to the avian world. Their yellow plumage serves as a visual spectacle, catching our attention and brightening up their surroundings. From the charming Yellow Warbler to the striking Western Tanager, these birds showcase the diversity of colors and patterns found in nature. Their yellow bellies not only make them visually appealing but also serve important functions in their lives, such as attracting mates and signaling their presence within their habitat. As we conclude our exploration of birds with yellow bellies, let us appreciate the beauty and significance of these captivating creatures, and continue to marvel at the wonders of the natural world they inhabit.

35 Birds With Yellow Bellies:

  • American Goldfinch
  • Common Yellowthroat
  • Western Meadowlark
  • Lesser Goldfinch
  • Prairie Warbler
  • Orange-crowned Warbler
  • Prothonotary Warbler
  • Orchard Oriole Female
  • Western Tanager
  • Canada Warbler
  • Cape May Warbler
  • Magnolia Warbler
  • Pine Warbler
  • Yellow Warbler
  • Orchard Oriole Female
  • Western Kingbird
  • Baltimore Oriole Female
  • Altamira Oriole
  • Audubon’s Oriole
  • Eastern Meadowlark
  • Yellow-throated Warbler
  • Nashville Warbler
  • Palm Warbler
  • Cedar Waxwing
  • Evening Grosbeak
  • Scott’s Oriole
  • Spot Breasted Oriole
  • Streaked Backed Oriole Female
  • Hooded Oriole
  • Wilson’s Warbler
  • Hooded Warbler
  • Williamson’s Sapsucker Male
  • Great Crested Flycatcher
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends.Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all.Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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