18 Birds With Red Mohawks {Images + IDs]

Birds With Red Mohawks

Get ready to embark on an exciting journey into the vibrant world of birds with red mohawks. These birds stand out from the crowd with their striking plumage that resembles a fiery crest. In this blog post, we will delve into the fascinating lives of these unique feathered creatures, exploring their habitats, behaviors, and the intriguing stories behind their distinctive red mohawks. From the tropical rainforests to the open grasslands, these birds have carved their place with flair and charisma. Join us as we unravel the secrets of these avian rebels and discover the captivating allure of birds with red mohawks.

List of Birds with Red Mohawks

Andean Cock-of-the-Rock (Black Birds With Red Mohawks)

Red Birds With Black Wings

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  • Scientific name: Rupicola peruvianus
  • Lifespan: Up to 20 years
  • Size: Approximately 33-38 cm (13-15 inches)
  • Native to: Andean cloud forests in South America

The Andean Cock-of-the-Rock is a beautiful bird species that inhabits the cloud forests of the Andean area in South America. This bird is noted for its bright plumage and distinctive courting antics.

The male Andean Cock-of-the-Rock is a sight to see, with its vivid orange plumage, big crested head, and distinctive fan-shaped tail. During the mating season, males assemble at communal display places called leks, where they compete for the attention of females. They execute elaborate performances, jumping, bowing, and expanding their wings to reveal their brilliant feathers.

Females, in comparison, have more muted plumage, with brownish tones and a shorter crest. They carefully pick partners based on the males’ displays and general fitness.

These birds typically graze on fruits, insects, and tiny vertebrates, utilizing their sharp beaks to devour their diversified diet. They are significant seed dispersers in their forest environments.

Scarlet-horned manakin

Black Birds with Red Heads

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Origin: Native to Venezuela and adjacent Guyana and northern Brazil

Size: 12 cm

Small passerine birds known as scarlet-horned manakins (Pipra cornuta) inhabit the Neotropical ecozone. The male of this species is visually remarkable, with a black coat, a red head, and tufts that resemble horns on the sides of its head.

Females have an olive-green top body and a whitish underbelly. It is a vocal bird, making a sequence of high-pitched trills as part of its song. Forests and other woods are home to scarlet-horned manakins, which usually perch quite high in the trees.

The male develops and guards a territory, and they are monogamous. A little cup-shaped nest made of plant material is constructed by the female, who then incubates it for around two weeks. The chicks are nourished by both parents for around six weeks after hatching before becoming independent.

Red-crested Turaco

Grey crowned crane

  • Scientific name: Tauraco erythrolophus
  • Lifespan: 9 years
  • Size: 19 to 20 in
  • Native to:  Angola

The Red-crested Turaco (Tauraco erythrolophus) is a stunning bird species found in the forests and woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa. Here is a short description of the Red-crested Turaco’s behavior and habitat:

Appearance:

The Red-crested Turaco is known for its vibrant plumage. It has a green body with a black mask around its eyes and a prominent, brilliant red crest on top of its head. Its wings are adorned with a mix of green and red feathers, and its long tail features a bright red terminal band.

Behavior:

Red-crested Turacos are mainly arboreal, spending their time in the upper levels of the forest canopy. They are known for their graceful and agile flight, characterized by their slow, fluttering wingbeats interspersed with short glides. They are often observed hopping and climbing among branches and foliage in search of food.

Diet:

These turacos are primarily frugivorous, meaning they primarily feed on fruits. They have a particular affinity for a variety of fruits, including berries, figs, and other soft fruits. In addition to fruits, they may also consume flowers, buds, and leaves. Occasionally, they supplement their diet with insects and small vertebrates.

Habitat:

Red-crested Turacos are typically found in the forests and woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa. They inhabit a range of habitats, including tropical and subtropical moist forests, gallery forests along rivers, and woodland savannahs. They are most abundant in areas with dense vegetation, providing them with ample food sources and cover.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

Red-crested Turacos are monogamous and typically form long-term pair bonds. They build large, bulky nests made of sticks and twigs, usually positioned at the fork of a tree. The female lays 1-3 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. Both parents are involved in caring for the chicks, feeding them regurgitated fruit pulp until they are ready to fledge.

Crested Partridge (Black Birds With Red Mohawks)

  • Scientific name: Rollulus rouloul
  • Lifespan: about 5 years
  • Size: 9.8 in
  • Native to: South Burma, south Thailand, Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo

The Crested Partridge (Rollulus rouloul) is a species of bird that belongs to the family Phasianidae, which includes pheasants, quails, and partridges. The Crested Partridge is also known as the Roul-roul, Red-crowned Wood Partridge, or Green Wood Partridge. They are native to Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, bamboo thickets, and plantations.

These birds are small, plump birds that grow to be about 25-30 cm (10-12 in) in length and have distinctive crests of feathers on their heads, which can be raised or lowered depending on their mood. They are primarily brown in color, with greenish-black feathers on their backs and reddish-brown feathers on their wings and tails. They have bright red beaks and legs.

Crested Partridges are ground-dwelling birds that feed on a variety of plant materials, including seeds, fruits, and insects. They are typically monogamous and form long-lasting pairs. The female lays a clutch of 4-6 eggs, which are incubated by both parents.

Ruby-crowned kinglet

Today’s Mass Extinction and Holocene-Anthropocene Thermal Maximum

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) is a small songbird found in North America. Despite its small size, this bird possesses remarkable plumage and behavior. Here is a short description of the Ruby-crowned Kinglet’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet is a tiny bird, measuring only about 9 to 11 centimeters in length. Its plumage consists of olive-green upperparts and whitish underparts. Males have a distinct feature—a hidden crown patch of brilliant red feathers, which they display when agitated or during courtship. However, the red crown is often concealed and difficult to spot. Females lack the red crown and exhibit a more subdued appearance.

Behavior:

Ruby-crowned Kinglets are known for their hyperactive behavior and incessant movement. They are constantly in motion, flitting about tree branches and foliage in search of food. Their wings are quick and agile, allowing them to hover, fly sideways, and perform acrobatic maneuvers while foraging.

During the breeding season, males establish and defend territories through song and aggressive displays. The male’s song is a series of high-pitched, rapid, and musical trills. Despite their small size, male Ruby-crowned Kinglets have a surprisingly loud and complex song that can be heard from a considerable distance.

Habitat:

Ruby-crowned Kinglets breed in the coniferous forests of North America, including spruce, fir, and pine forests. They prefer dense vegetation and can be found in both mature forests and regenerating clearings. During migration, they can also be seen in deciduous woodlands and shrublands.

These kinglets are highly migratory, traveling long distances to their breeding grounds in the northern parts of their range during spring and returning south for winter. They often form mixed-species foraging flocks during migration, joining other small birds in search of food and safety.

Northern Cardinal (birds with red crest)

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Cardinalis cardinalis
  • Lifespan: 3 to 5 years
  • Size: 7 to 9 inches
  • Native to: eastern United States

The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a beautiful bird species native to North America. Here is a short description of the Northern Cardinal’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Northern Cardinal is a medium-sized songbird known for its striking appearance. The males have vibrant red plumage on their bodies, crests, and beaks, while their faces are black around the eyes. The females have a more subdued appearance with a combination of gray, brown, and red tones. Both sexes have distinctive crests on top of their heads. The bright red color of the male’s plumage makes it easily recognizable and often considered a symbol of beauty.

Behavior:

Northern Cardinals are often found in pairs or small family groups. They are non-migratory birds and can be seen year-round in their preferred habitats. The males are known for their beautiful and melodious songs, which they use to establish their territories and attract mates. Their songs are a series of clear, whistling notes that vary in pattern and tone.

These cardinals are primarily seed-eaters, feeding on a variety of seeds, grains, and fruits. They have strong, cone-shaped beaks that enable them to crack open seeds and husks. They also eat insects and other small invertebrates, particularly during the breeding season when they require additional protein for their growing chicks.

Habitat:

Northern Cardinals are versatile birds that can be found in various habitats across North America, including woodlands, forests, gardens, and parks. They are particularly fond of areas with dense shrubs and thickets, where they find shelter and nesting sites. They are adaptable to both urban and rural environments, making them a familiar sight in backyard bird feeders.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, Northern Cardinals form monogamous pairs. The female builds a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, leaves, and grass, typically positioned in a dense shrub or small tree. The female lays a clutch of 2-5 eggs, which are incubated by the female alone. The male assists in feeding the female during incubation and both parents participate in feeding and caring for the chicks until they fledge.

Red-crested Cardinal (Grey Birds With Red Mohawks)

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  • Scientific name: Paroaria coronata
  • Lifespan: Up to 10 years
  • Size: Approximately 17-20 centimeters (6.7-7.9 inches)
  • Origin: South America (native to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay)

The Red-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) is a vibrant bird species native to South America. Here is a short description of the Red-crested Cardinal’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Red-crested Cardinal is a striking bird with a bold combination of colors. It has a bright red plumage on most of its body, including the head, chest, and back. The black face mask contrasts with the red plumage, and it has a prominent red crest on top of its head. The wings and tail are mostly black, with white patches on the wings that become visible during flight. Overall, it is a visually captivating bird with its distinctive and contrasting colors.

Behavior:

Red-crested Cardinals are known for their lively and social nature. They are often found in pairs or small flocks, frequently engaging in social interactions. They have a variety of vocalizations, including chirps and trills, which they use for communication and to establish their presence in their territory.

These cardinals are primarily seed-eaters, feeding on a variety of seeds, grains, and fruits. They are also known to consume insects and small invertebrates, especially during the breeding season when they require additional protein for their growing chicks.

Habitat:

Red-crested Cardinals inhabit a range of habitats in South America, including open woodlands, forest edges, shrublands, and gardens. They are particularly adaptable to human-altered environments and can often be found in urban and suburban areas with suitable vegetation and food sources.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, Red-crested Cardinals form monogamous pairs. The female builds a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, leaves, and other plant materials, usually positioned in a shrub or tree. The female lays a clutch of 2-4 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. Both parents participate in feeding and caring for the chicks until they fledge and become independent.

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant:

Most Beautiful Birds in the World

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  • Scientific name: Chrysolophus amherstiae
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Size: 100-120 centimeters (39-47 inches)
  • Origin: China and Myanmar

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) is an exquisite bird species renowned for its colorful and elegant plumage. Here is a short description of Lady Amherst’s Pheasant’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant is a medium-sized bird with a long, graceful tail that can reach impressive lengths. The male has a stunning and intricate plumage display. Its head is adorned with a black crest, and its face is marked by a red patch around the eye. The neck and breast are black, while the back and wings showcase beautiful metallic green and blue feathers. The long, flowing tail feathers are intricately patterned, displaying a combination of black, white, and vibrant colors such as green, blue, and copper. In contrast, the female is more modestly colored, with a brown body and mottled patterning.

Behavior:

Lady Amherst’s Pheasants are known for their shy and elusive nature. They prefer to dwell in dense forests and woodlands with ample vegetation cover, where they can blend into their surroundings. They are mostly ground-dwelling birds but have the ability to fly short distances when necessary. Males are territorial and use their striking plumage and elaborate courtship displays to attract females.

Feeding habits:

These pheasants primarily feed on a diverse diet consisting of seeds, grains, berries, and insects. They forage on the ground, scratching and pecking at the forest floor in search of food. They may also venture into shrubs and low vegetation to find fruits and insects.

Habitat:

Lady Amherst’s Pheasants are native to the mountainous regions of southwestern China and northern Myanmar. They inhabit dense forests, bamboo thickets, and areas near water sources, such as streams and rivers. They require a mix of open spaces for foraging and dense cover for protection.

 

Royal Flycatcher (Brown Birds With Red Mohawks)

Crested Auklet

  • Scientific name: Onychorhynchus
  • Lifespan: 6 years
  • Size: 5.9 in
  • Native to: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela

The Royal Flycatcher (Onychorhynchus coronatus) is a fascinating bird species found in Central and South America. Here is a short description of the Royal Flycatcher’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Royal Flycatcher is known for its unique and elaborate crest, which is prominently displayed during certain behaviors. The crest consists of bright red or orange feathers, which can be erected into an impressive fan shape. The rest of the bird’s plumage is predominantly olive-brown, blending well with the forested environments it inhabits. Its bill is long and slender, ideal for capturing its preferred prey.

Behavior:

As its name suggests, the Royal Flycatcher belongs to a group of birds known for their flycatching behavior. It perches on branches and sallies forth to capture insects mid-flight, returning to its perch after a successful catch. The bird’s long crest serves as a visual signal during territorial displays and courtship rituals, such as when the male spreads its crest in an impressive fan shape to attract a mate or ward off potential threats.

Habitat:

The Royal Flycatcher can be found in the tropical rainforests and moist woodlands of Central and South America. It prefers dense vegetation, often occupying the understory or mid-canopy levels. It is well adapted to life in the forest, utilizing its agile flight and maneuverability to navigate through the foliage in search of insects.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, the Royal Flycatcher constructs an elaborate nest that hangs from the underside of a horizontal branch. The nest is a long, tube-like structure with a small entrance hole on the side. The female is primarily responsible for nest building, while the male defends the territory. After mating, the female lays a clutch of 2-4 eggs, which both parents take turns incubating. Once the chicks hatch, both parents participate in feeding and caring for them until they fledge.

Gang-gang Cockatoo (Black Birds With Red Mohawks)

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  • Scientific name: Callocephalon fimbriatum
  • Lifespan: Up to 40 years
  • Size: Approximately 35-40 centimeters (14-16 inches)
  • Origin: Australia (native to southeastern Australia)

Gang-gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) is a unique and charming bird species native to Australia. Here is a short description of the Gang-gang Cockatoo’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Gang-gang Cockatoo is a medium-sized cockatoo with a distinctive appearance. The adult male has a dark gray body with a vibrant red head and crest. The crest is short and spiky, giving the bird a distinctive punk-like hairstyle. Females and immature birds have a similar body coloration but lack the vibrant red color on the head, instead displaying a lighter gray or brown coloration.

Behavior:

Gang-gang Cockatoos are generally calm and relatively quiet compared to other cockatoo species. They are known for their gentle demeanor and endearing behaviors and often move in small groups or pairs, foraging for food and socializing with each other.

These cockatoos primarily feed on seeds and fruits, especially those of eucalyptus trees. They have strong beaks adapted for cracking open nuts and seeds, allowing them to access their preferred food sources. They may also feed on insects, flowers, and nectar, particularly during the breeding season.

Habitat:

Gang-gang Cockatoos are found in a variety of habitats across southeastern Australia, including forests, woodlands, and mountain regions. They are particularly associated with areas dominated by eucalyptus trees, which provide both food and suitable nesting sites. They are adaptable birds and can also be found in suburban areas with suitable vegetation.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, Gang-gang Cockatoos form monogamous pairs. The female chooses a suitable tree hollow as a nesting site, where she lays a clutch of 2-3 eggs. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs and caring for the chicks. The male often announces his presence with a distinct “creaky gate” call, which is a low-pitched vocalization resembling the sound of a rusty hinge.

Crimson-crested woodpecker

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  • Scientific name: Campephilus melanoleucos
  • Lifespan: Up to 20 years
  • Size: Approximately 32-38 centimeters (13-15 inches)
  • Origin: South America (found in parts of Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Argentina)

Crimson-crested Woodpecker (Campephilus melanoleucos) is a stunning bird species native to Central and South America. Here is a short description of the Crimson-crested Woodpecker’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Crimson-crested Woodpecker is a large woodpecker with a bold and striking appearance. It has a black body with a prominent white belly and white wing patches. The most distinctive feature is its bright crimson crest, which stands upright on top of its head. The male and female have similar plumage, with the male having a slightly longer and more pronounced crest.

Behavior:

Crimson-crested Woodpeckers are highly skilled climbers and powerful excavators. They use their strong bills to drum on tree trunks and create cavities in search of insects, grubs, and other invertebrates that reside within the wood. They have a rapid drumming sound that can be heard throughout the forest as they communicate and establish their territories.

These woodpeckers are also known for their distinctive calls, which include a series of sharp and loud “kwee-kwee-kwee” notes. Their calls are often used for communication and mate attraction.

Habitat:

Crimson-crested Woodpeckers inhabit a range of forested habitats, including tropical rainforests, deciduous forests, and wooded savannas. They are found in both lowland and mountainous regions, provided there are suitable trees for foraging and nesting. They prefer mature trees with decaying wood, as they provide ample food sources and potential nest sites.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

These woodpeckers are monogamous and form long-term pair bonds. They excavate their nesting cavities in tree trunks, often choosing dead or decaying trees. The female lays a clutch of 2-4 white eggs, which are incubated by both parents. Both parents take turns caring for the nest and feeding the young after hatching.

Crested Ant-tanager

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  • Scientific name: Habia cristata
  • Lifespan: Up to 10 years
  • Size: Approximately 15-17 centimeters (6-7 inches)
  • Origin: Central and South America (found in countries such as Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela)

Crested Ant-tanager (Habia cristata) is a beautiful bird species found in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Here is a short description of the Crested Ant-tanager’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Crested Ant-tanager is a medium-sized bird with a unique and striking appearance. It has a black body with a contrasting white throat and bright red undertail coverts. The most distinctive feature is its vibrant crest, which is a combination of yellow and orange. The crest can be raised or lowered depending on the bird’s mood and behavior. Both males and females have similar plumage, although the male’s crest is often longer and more pronounced.

Behavior:

Crested Ant-tanagers are primarily insectivorous, with a particular fondness for ants and other arthropods. They forage in the understory and mid-canopy levels of the forest, often joining mixed-species foraging flocks where different bird species cooperate to locate food sources. They use their sharp bills to search for insects and extract them from tree bark and vegetation.

While primarily insectivorous, these tanagers may also consume small fruits and berries as supplementary food sources. They are known for their melodious songs, which consist of a series of rich and varied notes. Their songs are often heard during the breeding season and are used to establish territories and attract mates.

Habitat:

Crested Ant-tanagers inhabit dense tropical forests, including both primary and secondary-growth forests. They prefer areas with a thick understory and abundant vegetation, as it provides them with ample foraging opportunities and suitable nesting sites. They are typically found in lowland forests but can also be seen in mountainous regions up to moderate elevations.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, Crested Ant-tanagers form monogamous pairs. The female constructs a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, leaves, and moss, often positioned in a dense shrub or small tree. She lays a clutch of 2-3 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. After hatching, both parents participate in feeding and caring for the chicks until they fledge.

Crested Malimbe

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  • Scientific name: Malimbus malimbicus
  • Lifespan: Up to 12 years
  • Size: Approximately 18-20 centimeters (7-8 inches)
  • Origin: West and Central Africa (found in countries such as Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, and Congo)

Crested Malimbe (Malimbus malimbicus) is a striking bird species native to the tropical forests of West and Central Africa. Here is a short description of the Crested Malimbe’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Crested Malimbe is a medium-sized bird with a unique and eye-catching appearance. The male has a glossy black body with a bright red crown, throat, and upper breast. It also has a prominent, elongated crest that extends backward from the top of its head. The female, on the other hand, has predominantly brown plumage with some red on the crown and throat but lacks the long crest of the male.

Behavior:

Crested Malimbes are social birds that often gather in small to large flocks. They are known for their acrobatic and agile movements as they forage for food in the forest canopy and primarily feed on fruits, nectar, and insects, using their strong bills to extract food from flowers and foliage. They may also visit bird feeders in some areas.

During courtship displays, the males perform elaborate flight displays and vocalizations to attract females. They may also engage in aggressive interactions with rival males, defending their territories and mating rights.

Habitat:

Crested Malimbes inhabit dense forests, particularly in the lowland and submontane regions of West and Central Africa. They are commonly found in primary and secondary forests, as well as forest edges and clearings. They prefer areas with a dense canopy and abundant fruiting trees, which provide them with both food and suitable nesting sites.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

These birds are polygynous, with a single male often mating with multiple females. They construct elaborate, hanging nests made of woven plant fibers, suspended from the outer branches of trees. The female is primarily responsible for nest construction, while the male assists in gathering materials. Once the nest is complete, the female lays a clutch of 2-3 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. Both parents participate in feeding and caring for the chicks after hatching.

Flame-crested Tanager

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  • Scientific name: Tachyphonus cristatus
  • Lifespan: Up to 10 years
  • Size: Approximately 13-14 centimeters (5-6 inches)
  • Origin: South America (found in countries such as Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina)

Flame-crested Tanager (Tachyphonus cristatus) is a stunning bird species native to the tropical forests of Central and South America. Here is a short description of the Flame-crested Tanager’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Flame-crested Tanager is a medium-sized bird known for its vibrant and fiery plumage. It has a black body with a bright red crest on top of its head, resembling a flickering flame. The wings and tail are also black, while the underparts are a contrasting bright yellow. The male and female have similar plumage, although the male’s crest is typically longer and more pronounced.

Behavior:

Flame-crested Tanagers are active and social birds that are often seen in small groups or mixed-species flocks. They forage in the mid to upper levels of the forest, hopping between branches and foliage in search of insects, fruits, and seeds. Their strong bills are well-suited for cracking open seeds and consuming small insects.

These tanagers are known for their melodious and varied songs. They have a wide repertoire of musical notes and can produce a series of sweet and thrilling sounds. Their songs are often heard during the breeding season, as they use them to communicate with other individuals and defend their territories.

Habitat:

Flame-crested Tanagers inhabit tropical forests, including both primary and secondary-growth forests, as well as forest edges and clearings. They are typically found in lowland areas, but they can also be found at higher elevations in mountainous regions. They prefer areas with a dense canopy and diverse vegetation, providing them with ample foraging opportunities and suitable nesting sites.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

During the breeding season, Flame-crested Tanagers form monogamous pairs. The female builds a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, leaves, and other plant materials, usually positioned in the fork of a tree branch. She lays a clutch of 2-3 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. After hatching, both parents take turns feeding and caring for the chicks until they fledge.

Red-crested Cotinga

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  • Scientific name: Ampelion rubrocristatus
  • Lifespan: Up to 12 years
  • Size: Approximately 25-28 centimeters (10-11 inches)
  • Origin: South America (found in countries such as Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia)

Red-crested Cotinga (Ampelion rubrocristatus) is a dazzling bird species native to the cloud forests of South America. Here is a short description of the Red-crested Cotinga’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

Red-crested Cotinga is a medium-sized bird known for its striking and vibrant plumage. The male has a glossy black body with a brilliant red crest on top of its head. Its wings and tail are also black, while the underparts are a contrasting white. The female, on the other hand, has a more subdued plumage, with a grayish-brown body and a shorter crest.

Behavior:

Red-crested Cotingas are generally solitary birds, often perching high up in the forest canopy. They primarily feed on fruits, consuming a variety of berries and small fruits found in the forest. They have a specialized bill adapted for swallowing large fruits whole.

Males are known for their unique courtship display, which involves fluffing up their crests and vocalizing to attract females. Their vocalizations are a mix of high-pitched whistles and melodious notes. Once a pair forms, they may engage in cooperative breeding, with both parents participating in nest-building, incubation, and raising the young.

Habitat:

Red-crested Cotingas inhabit the montane cloud forests of the Andes, typically found at elevations between 1,000 and 3,000 meters. They prefer moist, misty environments with a dense canopy and abundant fruiting trees. These forests provide them with both food sources and suitable nesting sites.

Breeding and nesting behavior:

The breeding season for Red-crested Cotingas typically occurs between the months of October and February. The female constructs a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, leaves, and other plant materials, usually positioned on a horizontal branch. She lays a clutch of 2-3 eggs, which are incubated by both parents. After hatching, both parents take turns feeding and caring for the chicks until they fledge.

Rough-crested Malkoha

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  • Scientific name: Dasylophus superciliosus
  • Lifespan: Up to 10 years
  • Size: Approximately 40-45 centimeters (16-18 inches)
  • Origin: Southeast Asia (found in countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand)

A species of cuckoo in the family Cuculidae is called Dasylophus supercilious, commonly known as the Rough-crested Malkoha or Red-crested Malkoha. It is only found on the Philippine island of Luzon, where tropical wet lowland forest is its native habitat. They are large birds with a distinctive crests, long tails, and blackish plumage with a white tail tip and blue gloss on the back.
Wide red eye-ring, yellow bill with red at the base, and shaggy red crest from the head are features of the Scale-feathered Malkoha, which is similar in size and form but lacks the latter bird’s conspicuous white hood.
The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) rates the Rough-crested Malkoha as Least Concern owing to its wide range and dependable population.

Moluccan Cockatoo (Salmon-crested Cockatoo)

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  • Scientific name: Cacatua moluccensis
  • Lifespan: Up to 80 years
  • Size: Approximately 46-52 cm (18-20 inches)
  • Native to: Indonesia, specifically the Moluccan islands

The Moluccan Cockatoo, also known as the Salmon-crested Cockatoo or the Moluccan Corella (Cacatua moluccensis), is a large and beautiful parrot species native to the Moluccan islands of Indonesia. Here is a short description of the Moluccan Cockatoo’s appearance and behavior:

Appearance:

The Moluccan Cockatoo is a majestic bird with predominantly white plumage. It has a distinct salmon-colored crest that can be raised or lowered, depending on the bird’s mood or communication signals. The crest, when fully extended, forms a striking and eye-catching display. The undersides of its wings and tail feathers have a soft peachy hue. It has a large, curved beak and strong, clawed feet, which are well-suited for climbing and gripping objects.

Behavior:

Moluccan Cockatoos are highly intelligent and social birds known for their playful and affectionate nature. They have a strong need for social interaction and can form deep bonds with their human caretakers. They are vocal birds and can emit a variety of calls, including loud screeches, whistles, and even mimic human speech.

In the wild, they form small flocks and are often seen flying or foraging together. They have a strong ability to manipulate objects with their beaks and feet, which they use to explore their environment and extract food. They have a diet that primarily consists of seeds, nuts, fruits, and vegetation.

Habitat:

The Moluccan Cockatoo is native to the tropical rainforests and coastal regions of the Moluccan islands in Indonesia. They are primarily found in lowland forests, but they can also be seen in secondary forests and plantations. They require a habitat with an abundance of tall trees for nesting and roosting.

Conservation status:

Moluccan Cockatoos are listed as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) due to habitat loss and illegal pet trade. Their population has declined in the wild, primarily due to deforestation and trapping for the exotic pet trade. Several conservation efforts are in place to protect and preserve their populations.

Pileated Woodpecker

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Dryocopus pileatus
  • Lifespan: 12-year
  • Size: 16-19 inches
  • Native to: North America

Native to North America, Pileated Woodpeckers have been seen in a variety of locations throughout the continent, including Colorado, Florida, Maine, Minnesota, New York State, Texas, and Virginia. Deciduous woods, woodland margins, city parks, and suburban regions are all places you may find them. To discover insects like ants, beetle larvae, or any other ground-based insects they can find, as well as small animals and fruits, they utilize their pointed beaks to burrow into trees.
They have a body length of 16 to 18 inches and a wingspan of 27 to 30 inches, making them the biggest woodpecker in the country. The Pileated Woodpecker has a distinctive red crest on top of its head, black plumage all over, and white stripes running down its face and neck. When it comes to their nesting locations and eating territories, they are said to be very possessive.

Final Thoughts on Birds With Red Mohawks

As we conclude our exploration into the world of birds with red mohawks, we have been captivated by their striking plumage and unique characteristics. These avian rebels, with their fiery crests, stand out as true icons of the avian world. From their diverse habitats to their intriguing behaviors, these birds have demonstrated resilience and adaptability. Through our journey, we have gained a deeper appreciation for the beauty and charisma that birds with red mohawks bring to our natural world. Let us continue to cherish and protect these remarkable creatures, ensuring that their fiery spirit and distinctive appearance grace our skies for generations to come.

I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends.Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all.Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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