16 Beautiful Birds with Blue Tails [Images + IDs]

Birds with Blue Tails

Birds come in a rainbow of colors, but there’s something enchanting about those with brilliant blue tails. These birds, with their azure tail feathers, add a touch of magic to the world of avian wonders. In this blog post, we’re going to take a closer look at the fascinating world of birds with blue tails. We’ll uncover what makes them so captivating, where they make their homes, and what they enjoy munching on. Join us as we embark on a journey to discover the mesmerizing beauty of these birds.

List of 16 Birds with Blue Tails

Collared Kingfisher

  • Scientific name: Todiramphus sanctus
  • Lifespan: Typically around 6 to 10 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 25 to 30 cm (9.8 to 11.8 inches)
  • Native to: Various regions in Asia and the Pacific, including Southeast Asia and Australia.

The Collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris) is a medium-sized kingfisher found in various parts of Asia and the Pacific region, including India, Southeast Asia, and the islands of the western Pacific. Adult Collared Kingfishers have striking plumage with a bright blue back, wings, and tail. They have a white face, throat, and underparts, with a black collar that extends around their neck.

These kingfishers inhabit a wide range of environments, including coastal areas, mangroves, forests, and urban parks. They are known for their fishing skills, diving into the water to catch fish and small aquatic creatures.

Collared Kingfishers are vocal birds with a variety of calls, including loud and piercing whistles. They are often seen perched on utility wires, branches, or other elevated vantage points while hunting. Their adaptability to various habitats and striking appearance make them a common and well-loved bird in their range.

Woodland Kingfisher

  • Scientific name: Halcyon senegalensis
  • Lifespan: Typically around 6 to 10 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 20 to 25 cm (7.9 to 9.8 inches)
  • Native to: Sub-Saharan Africa, often found in woodland and savanna habitats.

The Woodland Kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis) is a colorful and striking bird native to sub-Saharan Africa. Adult Woodland Kingfishers have a bright blue crown, wings, and tail, which contrasts with a white face, throat, and underparts. They have a distinctive black eye stripe and a long, thick red bill.

These kingfishers inhabit a range of woodland habitats, including savannas, grasslands, and open forests, often near water sources. Despite their name, they do not specialize in catching fish; instead, they primarily feed on a diet of insects, small vertebrates, and occasionally, small fish.

Woodland Kingfishers are known for their melodious and piercing calls, which are often heard during the breeding season. Their striking colors and vocalizations make them a beloved bird species among birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts in Africa.

Blue-and-White Flycatcher

  • Scientific name: Cyanoptila cyanomelana
  • Lifespan: Information not readily available.
  • Wingspan: Information not readily available.
  • Native to: Parts of East Asia, including Japan and China.

The Blue-and-White Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cyanomelana) is a small and captivating bird found in parts of Asia, including Japan, China, and Taiwan. Adult male Blue-and-White Flycatchers have striking plumage, featuring bright azure-blue upperparts, wings, and tail, which contrast with their white underparts. They have a distinctive black eye mask and a black bib. Female Blue-and-White Flycatchers, on the other hand, have more subdued colors, with pale brownish-gray plumage.

These flycatchers typically inhabit forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas, often near streams or water bodies. They primarily feed on a diet of insects and small invertebrates, which they capture by sallying out from perches to catch their prey in mid-air.

Blue-and-White Flycatchers are known for their melodious songs and calls, including soft, flute-like whistles. They are migratory birds and are highly prized by birdwatchers for their stunning appearance and beautiful songs.

California Scrub-Jay

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  • Scientific name: Aphelocoma californica
  • Lifespan: Typically 6-15 years in the wild.
  • Size: Medium-sized songbird; about 11-12 inches (28-31 cm) in length.
  • Range: The California Scrub-Jay is native to western North America

The California Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) is a medium-sized and intelligent bird found in western North America, particularly in California. Adult California Scrub-Jays have predominantly blue plumage, including their head, wings, and tail. They have a lighter grayish-blue belly, and their wings are adorned with white patches. These jays have a distinctive blue crest on their head, which they can raise or lower.

These birds inhabit a variety of environments, including oak woodlands, chaparral, suburban gardens, and urban areas. They are omnivorous and have a diverse diet that includes insects, acorns, seeds, fruits, and even small vertebrates.

California Scrub-Jays are known for their intelligence, problem-solving abilities, and their tendency to hoard and cache food. They are vocal birds with a range of calls, including harsh squawks and melodious whistles. Their striking appearance, adaptability to human-altered landscapes, and inquisitive nature make them a common and familiar sight in many parts of California.

White-Throated Magpie-Jay

  • Scientific name: Calocitta formosa
  • Lifespan: Approximately 5 to 12 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 46 to 56 cm (18.1 to 22 inches)
  • Native to: Parts of Central America, including Mexico and Honduras.

The White-Throated Magpie-Jay (*Calocitta formosa*) is a striking and large songbird native to parts of Central America, particularly in Mexico and parts of Central America. Adult White-Throated Magpie-Jays have striking blue plumage on their heads, wings, and tails, which contrasts with their white throat and underparts. They have a long, graduated tail with black tips, and their eyes are surrounded by blue facial skin.

These magpie-jays inhabit a range of habitats, including tropical and subtropical forests, as well as gardens and urban areas. They are omnivorous birds, feeding on a diet that includes insects, small vertebrates, fruits, and eggs.

White-Throated Magpie-Jays are known for their vocalizations, including a variety of calls, chatters, and whistles.

Blue Jay

bluebirds in Florida

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  • Scientific name: Cyanocitta cristata
  • Lifespan: about 7 years
  • Size: 9 and 12 inches
  • Native to: North America

The blue jay is a large bird, measuring about 12 inches in length. It has a medium blue and white body with distinctive features like a blue crest on its head, which it can flatten at will. The bird also sports a gray belly and a white face. Its wings are a combination of white and blue with noticeable black spots. Interestingly, both male and female blue jays share the same appearance.

When it comes to their diet, blue jays are omnivorous, which means they eat a variety of foods. They enjoy insects, fruits, seeds, and nuts, and they are not averse to consuming other birds’ eggs and nestlings.

For those interested in attracting blue jays to their yards, offering whole peanuts, sunflower seeds, and cracked corn can be enticing.

Blue jays are quite adaptable when it comes to their habitat. They are commonly found in forested areas with mixed types of trees, but they are also a frequent sight in suburban and urban environments.

When it comes to nesting, blue jays build substantial nests made from twigs, bark, and mud, typically resting on tree branches at heights ranging from 5 to 50 feet. During the breeding season, they tend to have 1-2 broods, and each brood can contain 2-7 eggs. The eggs of blue jays vary in color from pale blue to a light brown base, often adorned with brown or gray spots. These eggs are relatively small, measuring about 1 inch by just under 1 inch. Both parents share the responsibility of incubating the eggs, which takes about 17-18 days. The young birds, or fledglings, typically leave the nest between 17 to 21 days after hatching.

Blue jays are known for being non-migratory birds. They tend to stay within their year-round range throughout all four seasons, including the breeding season. While they may move around within this range, they do not have a regular pattern of migrating north for breeding and south for the winter, as some other bird species do. However, in rare instances, some blue jays may venture west of their year-round range during the winter months.

Eastern Bluebird

bluebirds in Florida

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  • Scientific name: Sialia sialis
  • Lifespan: 6 to 10 years
  • Size: 6.3–8.3 in
  • Native to: Eastern North America and south as far as Nicaragua

Eastern bluebirds are small birds, measuring about 7 inches in length. They are easily recognizable by their vibrant royal blue plumage, along with an orange throat and breast, and a white belly and undertail. While both male and female eastern bluebirds share similar features, the female tends to have more muted colors.

When it comes to their diet, eastern bluebirds have a varied menu. During the spring and summer months, they primarily feed on insects and spiders. However, as the seasons change to fall and winter, their diet shifts towards small fruits.

For those looking to attract eastern bluebirds to their yards, providing suet, sunflower seeds, dried fruit, and jelly can be enticing food options.

Eastern bluebirds are often found in wide-open spaces, including fields and meadows, where they make their homes and raise their young.

In terms of nesting, eastern bluebirds are cavity nesters. The male bluebird takes on the task of selecting the nest site, which could be an old woodpecker hole in a tree or a manmade nestbox. However, it is the female who is responsible for building the nest. Interestingly, she may reuse the same nest for multiple broods. During the breeding season, they tend to have 2-7 broods, each containing 4-5 pale blue (sometimes white) eggs with no blemishes or discoloration. These eggs are relatively small, measuring about 0.9 inches by 0.8 inches. The incubation period for these eggs typically lasts from 11 to 19 days.

While many eastern bluebirds remain within their year-round range throughout the entire year, some exhibit migratory behavior. These migratory bluebirds head north for breeding and raising their young and then travel south during the winter months. They either return to their year-round range or move further west into regions like Colorado, New Mexico, and western Texas.

Their year-round range encompasses the U.S. states located south and east of Nebraska, as well as Mexico and Central America. During the breeding season, they can be found in regions including northwest Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, the northern half of Wisconsin and Michigan, New Hampshire, Maine, and parts of Canadian provinces such as Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec. In the winter, eastern bluebirds can be spotted in areas including eastern Colorado, New Mexico, western Texas, and northeast Mexico.

Indigo Bunting

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  • Scientific name: Passerina cyanea
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Size: 5 inches
  • Native to: Southern Canada to northern Florida during the breeding season, and from southern Florida to northern South America during the winter.

Indigo Buntings are commonly found in a variety of habitats. You can spot them in brushy fields, where they often perch on weedy plants, scrub areas, and along the edges of woodlands. They also make themselves at home in clearings within deciduous woods and along the edges of swamps.

When it comes to their diet, savannah sparrows have a diverse menu. They typically feed on small seeds, insects, and fruits. While they are not regular visitors to bird feeders, you may attract them by offering nyjer/thistle and white millet seeds.

Their preferred habitat includes brushy fields, weedy plants, scrubland, and woodland edges, as well as clearings within deciduous woods and swampy areas.

For nesting, Indigo Bunting creates cup-shaped nests, which they usually place in shrubs or trees about 3 feet high off the ground. During the breeding season, they tend to have 1-3 broods, with each brood containing 3-4 eggs. These eggs are white with a few brown spots.

Lazuli Bunting

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  • Scientific name: Passerina amoena
  • Lifespan: Up to 6 years
  • Size: Approximately 13 centimeters (5.1 inches) in length
  • Origin: Native to western North America

The Lazuli Bunting is a small bird, measuring about 5-6 inches in length. It’s known for its striking appearance with brilliant blue feathers on its upper body and a soft orange-cinnamon color on its chest. The bird also features a white belly and a patch of white on its shoulder. Its beak is cone-shaped, and it has a slightly flat forehead.

In terms of diet, Lazuli Buntings have a varied menu. They typically feed on insects, fruits, and grasses. While they forage in nature, you can also attract them to your yard by offering white proso millet, sunflower seeds, or nyjer thistle seeds at bird feeders.

These birds are commonly found in open woodlands, brushy hillsides, thickets, and even in backyard settings throughout the western regions of the United States.

When it comes to nesting, Lazuli Buntings create cup-shaped nests constructed from bark, twigs, and leaves. They usually position these nests in shrubs at a height of about 3 feet above the ground. During the breeding season, they typically have 1-2 broods, and each brood consists of 3-4 eggs. The eggs are relatively small, measuring between 0.7 to 0.8 inches in length. They can be pale blue to faint green/blue or even white in color. The incubation period for these eggs lasts for approximately 11-14 days.

Mountain Bluebird

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  • Scientific name: Sialia currucoides
  • Lifespan: Up to 6 years
  • Size: Approximately 16-20 centimeters (6-8 inches) in length
  • Origin: Native to North America

The Mountain Bluebird is a small bird, measuring about 7 inches in length. They are known for their sky-blue coloring, with darker blue wings and tails. Their undersides are lighter in shade, and they have a distinctive white undertail with black wingtips. These birds have straight, thin bills. Females, on the other hand, have a more subdued appearance, with grayish-brown feathers and a touch of soft blue on their wings and tail.

When it comes to their diet, Mountain Bluebirds have a varied menu. They primarily feed on insects, but they also enjoy consuming fruit and seeds.

While they are not commonly seen at bird feeders, Mountain Bluebirds prefer natural foraging. They are more likely to be found in open woodlands, fields, and prairies.

For nesting, Mountain Bluebirds are cavity nesters. They often use old woodpecker holes in trees or manmade nesting boxes for their nests. During the breeding season, they typically have 1-2 broods, with each brood containing 4-8 eggs. The eggs are relatively small, measuring about 1 inch by 0.8 inches. They can be pale blue to bluish-white, with pure white eggs being a rare occurrence. The incubation period for these eggs lasts for approximately 18-21 days.

Pinyon Jay

The Pinyon Jay is a bird that measures approximately 10-11 inches in length. These birds have a distinctive appearance with a dusty blue body, a lighter blue belly and throat, a short tail, and no crown on their heads. The female Pinyon Jay looks quite similar to the male in terms of its appearance.

In terms of diet, Pinyon Jays primarily feed on Pinyon-pine seeds, acorns, various fruits, and grains. However, they are not picky eaters and also consume insects, lizards, snakes, nestling birds, and small mammals.

While they may not be regular visitors to bird feeders, you can attract Pinyon Jays by offering whole peanuts, sunflower seeds, suet, and cracked corn.

Pinyon Jays tend to inhabit forested areas characterized by Pinyon-juniper trees, sagebrush, scrub oak, and other types of pine trees.

When it comes to nesting, Pinyon Jays construct large, bulky nests made of sticks and twigs in trees, often at heights ranging from 3 to 115 feet above the ground. They typically have one brood per breeding season, with each brood containing 2-5 eggs. The eggs are relatively large, measuring between 1.3 to 1.5 inches in length, and they are pale blue with dark brown specks. The incubation period for these eggs lasts for approximately 17 days, and the young birds, or fledglings, typically leave the nest between 21 to 22 days after hatching.

Blue-black Grosbeak

  • Scientific name: Cyanoloxia cyanoides
  • Lifespan: 6-7 years
  • Size: 5 to 6-inch
  • Native to: Middle America and northwestern South America

Blue grosbeaks are medium-sized birds, approximately 8 inches in length. They are quite eye-catching with their vibrant, large, bright blue bodies and silver bills. You can easily spot chestnut wing bars on them. In contrast, the female blue grosbeak has a primary color that resembles light cinnamon, with wings that are darker in color.

When it comes to their diet, blue grosbeaks enjoy a menu that includes insects, seeds, and grains. If you want to attract them to your yard, offering grain and birdseed can be enticing.

These birds tend to make their homes in areas with thick shrubbery and tall trees. For nesting, they create small cup-shaped nests using twigs and various organic materials, placing them in low-lying trees, shrubs, or bushes. They typically have 1-2 broods per breeding season, with each brood containing 3-5 eggs. The eggs are pale blue to white with occasional brown spots and are relatively small, measuring about 0.8 inches by 0.7 inches. The incubation period for these eggs lasts for approximately 12-13 days.

Blue grosbeaks are migratory birds. During the spring, they embark on a journey north to the United States to breed and raise their young. When fall arrives, they head back south for the winter, with many of them finding refuge in Mexico and the Caribbean islands. However, there is a small group of blue grosbeaks that call a specific area in Mexico their year-round home, and they do not typically migrate like their counterparts. In their year-round range, blue grosbeaks can be found in parts of Mexico, while their breeding range extends across the southern half of the United States, including North Dakota, South Dakota, and Kansas.

Red-breasted Nuthatch

birds with orange chest

  • Scientific name: Sitta canadensis
  • Lifespan:  6 years.
  • Size: 4.5 in
  • Native to: North Americ

The Red-Breasted Nuthatch is a small bird, measuring about 4.5 inches in length. These birds have distinctive features, including grayish-blue backs, a white head adorned with black stripes over each eye, and an orange-cinnamon-colored breast. They also have a pointed, pick-like beak. Female Red-Breasted Nuthatches share a similar appearance, but their undersides tend to have more muted colors. You’ll often spot them climbing upside-down on deciduous trees while foraging for insects beneath the bark.

When it comes to their diet, Red-Breasted Nuthatches primarily feed on insects, spiders, and various other bugs.

While they may not be regular visitors to bird feeders, you can attract Red-Breasted Nuthatches by offering suet, sunflower seeds, shelled peanuts, and fruit as feeder food.

Red-Breasted Nuthatches are commonly found in forested areas, particularly those primarily comprised of coniferous trees like pines. In the eastern regions, you can also find them in wooded areas with deciduous trees. During the winter months, southern populations of these birds tend to prefer mountainous regions before heading to lower-lying areas.

For nesting, Red-Breasted Nuthatches are cavity nesters, and they have a unique habit of excavating their own holes for nesting. During the breeding season, they typically have one brood, and each brood contains about 6 eggs. These eggs are white and speckled with red-brown markings.

Red-Breasted Nuthatches exhibit partial migratory behavior. While many remain in their year-round range throughout the year, others migrate south for the winter. Their year-round range encompasses southern Alaska, the western third of the United States, northern Minnesota and Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New England, and all Canadian provinces except Nunavut. During the winter, you can find them in U.S. states that are not part of their year-round range.

Steller’s Jay

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Cyanocitta stelleri
  • Lifespan: 16 years
  • Size: 12–13 in
  • Native to: Western North America and the mountains of Central America

The Steller’s Jay is another beautiful bird with a blue tail. It is a large bird, measuring around 11.5 inches in length. These birds are known for their striking appearance with a dark blue body and crest, contrasted by a black head and crest adorned with spots of blue. Female Steller’s Jays share a similar look to the males.

In terms of diet, Steller’s Jays have a varied menu. They primarily feed on nuts, seeds, fruits, and insects. Additionally, they are known to consume other birds’ eggs and nestlings, as well as small animals.

Although they may not be frequent visitors to bird feeders, you can attract Steller’s Jays by offering foods like whole peanuts, sunflower seeds, and suet.

Steller’s Jays are typically found in forested areas that feature a mix of tree types, including coniferous and deciduous trees.

For nesting, Steller’s Jays create large open-cup nests constructed from twigs, bark, and mud. They usually position these nests high up in conifer trees. During the breeding season, they typically have one brood, consisting of 4-5 eggs. These eggs have a distinctive appearance, with blue or green coloration and dark brown, purple, or olive spots. The incubation period for these eggs lasts for approximately 16-18 days, and the young jays, or fledglings, typically leave the nest at around 16-18 days old.

Western Bluebird

  • Scientific name: Sialia mexicana
  • Lifespan: 6 to 10 years
  • Size: 5.9 to 7.1 in
  • Native to: North American

The Western Bluebird is a small bird, measuring around 7 inches in length. These birds have distinctive appearances, with deep blue underparts and an orange-chestnut back and breast in males. In contrast, females have a gray-blue coloration, light blue wings and tail, and a pale chestnut breast.

In terms of diet, Western Bluebirds primarily feed on insects, fruits, and berries.

While they may not be regular visitors to bird feeders, you can attract Western Bluebirds by offering them mealworms as feeder food.

These birds are typically found in open woodlands, particularly those with pine and oak trees, as well as orchards and farmland that have some trees for perching and nesting.

Speaking of nesting, Western Bluebirds are cavity nesters, meaning they nest in existing holes or cavities. They often utilize old woodpecker holes or manmade nesting boxes. During the breeding season, they can have two broods, with each brood containing 4-5 eggs. These eggs are usually pale blue without blemishes, although they can sometimes be white. The size of these eggs varies, with a length ranging from 0.8 to 2.4 inches and a width of about 0.8 inches. The incubation period for these eggs lasts from 12 to 18 days, and the young Western Bluebirds typically fledge at about 20 days of age.

Great Blue Turaco

  • Scientific name: Corythaeola cristata
  • Lifespan: 30 yrs
  • Size: 28- 30 inches
  • Native to: Guinea east across Africa to the Imatong Mountains in southern Sudan, Uganda, Tanzania and Western Kenya and south to Democratic Replublic of Congo and Angola

The Great Blue Turaco is a large and colorful bird native to the rainforests and woodlands of equatorial Africa. It is known for its distinctive appearance, characterized by vibrant green plumage with a prominent white patch on its face, a bright red ring around its eyes, and a striking blue crest on its head.

These turacos primarily feed on a diet of fruits, especially figs, and they are known for their unique feeding behavior. They are capable of swallowing fruits whole and later regurgitating seeds and pits, contributing to seed dispersal in their habitat.

Great Blue Turacos are often found in the canopy of dense forests and are appreciated for their striking and vibrant colors, making them a sought-after species for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts.

Final Thoughts on Birds with Blue Tails

As we conclude our exploration into the world of avian wonder, we’ve reveled in the magical beauty of birds with blue tails. These captivating creatures, with their vibrant azure feathers, remind us that nature is an endless source of fascination and surprise.

Throughout our journey, we’ve celebrated their unique appearances and gained insights into their habitats, behaviors, and dietary preferences. These blue-tailed birds are a testament to the remarkable diversity of our natural world.

I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends.Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all.Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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