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38 Birds that Lay Speckled Eggs [Detailed Guide]

Ever noticed those pretty eggs with spots? They’re like little works of art you often find around homes and gardens. But what’s the deal with them?

Some folks think that speckled eggs mean the bird is super healthy, munching on all the good stuff. Others just think those speckles are cool and make the eggs even more awesome.

Well, get ready because in this article we’re diving into the world of birds that lay speckled eggs – the different types, how to spot them, when they appear, and more! Let’s unravel the mysteries of these beautifully speckled eggs together.

List of 38 Birds that lay speckled eggs

Winter Wren:

The Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) is a small, hyperactive bird known for its diminutive size and vibrant, melodic song. It measures around 9 to 10 centimeters in length and has a short, cocked tail that it often holds upright. Its plumage is brown with subtle darker mottling, and its underparts are paler. Despite its small size, it has a powerful voice and is known for its loud, complex, and continuous trilling song.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Winter Wrens typically lay a clutch of 5 to 7 eggs. The eggs are small and spherical, measuring around 15 millimeters in diameter. They have a smooth, glossy texture and are usually white or cream-colored with tiny speckles of reddish-brown. The egg coloration provides some camouflage when placed in concealed nests amidst thick undergrowth, fallen leaves, or tree crevices.

Great Tit:

The Great Tit (Parus major) is a colorful and agile bird belonging to the tit family. It is medium-sized, measuring approximately 12 centimeters in length. Great Tits have striking plumage with a glossy blue-black head and neck, a yellow chest, and white underparts. Their wings are blue-gray with a distinct white bar, and they have a black stripe running down their belly. These birds are highly adaptable and can be found in a wide range of habitats, from woodlands to urban gardens.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Great Tits typically lay a clutch of 7 to 12 eggs. The eggs are small and spherical, measuring about 18 millimeters in diameter. They have a smooth texture and are usually white or cream-colored with fine speckles of reddish-brown, which are more concentrated at the larger end of the egg. The egg coloration helps camouflage them when they are placed in tree cavities, nest boxes, or other concealed nesting sites.

Melodious Warblers:

Melodious Warblers are a group of small passerine birds belonging to the family Sylviidae. They are known for their melodious and intricate songs, which they use to communicate with other birds and establish territories. There are several species of Melodious Warblers, and their specific characteristics can vary. In general, they have slender bodies, often with brown or olive-green plumage that provides good camouflage in their preferred habitats, which include woodlands and shrubby areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Melodious Warblers typically lay small, smooth eggs that are usually pale blue or greenish-blue in color. The exact shade can vary between species, but it generally blends well with the environment where they build their nests, such as low vegetation or shrubs.

Song Thrush

  • Scientific name: Turdus philomelos
  • Lifespan: 3 or 4 years
  • Size: 8 to 19 – 21 cm
  • Native to: United Kingdom eastward, through Scandanavia and much of Russia, and in the winter they are primarily found in western Europe, the Middle East, and northern Africa.

The Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) is a medium-sized thrush species known for its musical and repetitive song. It measures around 20 centimeters in length and has brown upperparts with bold, dark speckles. Its underparts are pale with a warm, creamy hue and fewer speckles. The Song Thrush has a distinctive habit of smashing snail shells against rocks to extract the snail, making them recognizable by the presence of broken shells near their feeding areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Song Thrushes typically lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. The eggs are usually pale blue or greenish-blue, occasionally with fine speckles. This coloration helps camouflage the eggs when they are placed in cup-shaped nests hidden within vegetation or low branches.

Herring Gull

  • Scientific name: Larus argentatus
  • Lifespan: Up to 30 years or more
  • Size: Large; 22-26 inches (56-66 cm) in length, wingspan of 49-60 inches (124-152 cm)
  • Origin: Native to North America, Europe, and Asia; thrives in coastal and inland regions near water bodies.

The European Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) is a large, robust seabird known for its distinctive appearance and loud, raucous calls. It typically measures between 55 to 66 centimeters in length and has a wingspan ranging from 125 to 155 centimeters. Adult herring gulls are characterized by their white plumage, which is complemented by slate-gray wings with black wingtips. Their legs are pink and relatively short, adapted for both terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

European Herring Gulls usually lay a clutch of 2 to 4 eggs. The eggs are typically elliptical in shape and have a smooth, slightly matte texture. The color of herring gull eggs is variable, often ranging from pale greenish-blue to olive-brown with darker blotches and speckles. The eggshell coloration provides some camouflage when nestled in rocky or pebbly nests on coastal cliffs or islands.

Northern Mockingbird

Grey Birds

  • Scientific name: Mimus polyglottos
  • Lifespan: about 8 to 10 years
  • Wingspan: 12 to 14 inches
  • Native to the United States and in Canada and Mexico

The Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is a highly vocal and versatile songbird found primarily in North America. It is approximately 23 centimeters in length and has a slender, grayish-brown body with white wing patches that are conspicuous in flight. Its most remarkable feature is its ability to mimic the songs of other birds and produce a wide range of complex vocalizations, making it a true virtuoso of the avian world.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Northern Mockingbirds typically lay a clutch of 2 to 6 eggs. The eggs are small, elliptical, and have a smooth texture. They are usually pale blue or greenish-blue and can sometimes have a few fine speckles. The egg coloration provides some camouflage when they are placed in well-hidden nests within shrubs or trees.

California Gull

  • Scientific name: Larus californicus
  • Lifespan: Typically around 10 to 15 years
  • Wingspan: Approximately 110 to 130 cm (43.3 to 51.2 inches)
  • Native to: Western North America, including the western United States.

The California Gull (Larus californicus) is a medium-sized gull species native to western North America. It is known for its striking appearance and distinctive vocalizations. Adult California Gulls typically measure between 46 to 50 centimeters in length and have a wingspan of about 120 to 140 centimeters. Their plumage is primarily white with slate-gray wings. During the breeding season, they develop a dark eye-ring and red markings on their bills and legs.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

California Gulls usually lay a clutch of 2 to 3 eggs. The eggs are large and oval-shaped, with a smooth, slightly glossy texture. They typically have a pale greenish-blue or bluish-green color, which helps them blend in with their nest surroundings. California Gulls are known for nesting near lakes, rivers, and marshes, often on islands or in open areas with limited ground cover. Their nests are shallow depressions lined with grass and other plant materials. The subtle blue-green color of their eggs offers some camouflage against the nest’s surroundings, providing protection from potential predators.

Varied Thrush 

  • Scientific name: Ixoreus naevius
  • Lifespan: about 4 to 5 years
  • Size: 7.9 to 10.2 in
  • Native to: North America

The Varied Thrush (Ixoreus naevius) is a striking and colorful bird native to North America. It is known for its distinctive plumage and melodious song. These thrushes have a dark, slate-gray head with a bold white eyebrow stripe, which contrasts sharply with their bright orange breast and belly. The wings and back are darker gray with prominent white wing bars. Varied Thrushes are often found in coniferous and mixed forests in the western regions of North America.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Varied Thrushes typically lay a clutch of 3 to 4 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a pale blue-green color. The egg coloration helps them blend into the forested environments where they build their cup-shaped nests, usually on tree branches or in shrubs.

House finch

  • Scientific name: Haemorhous mexicanus
  • Life span: Up to 11 years
  • Size: 12-15 cm (4.7-5.9 in)
  • Weight: 16-27 g
  • Origin: North America

The House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a common and adaptable bird found throughout North America. Adult males of this species have vibrant plumage with bright red plumage on their heads, throats, and chests. Females and juveniles, on the other hand, are brown and streaked. House Finches are often associated with human habitation and can be frequently seen around bird feeders and urban areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

House Finches typically lay a clutch of 2 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. The color of House Finch eggs can vary from pale blue to greenish-blue. The subtle coloration provides some camouflage when they build their nests in various locations, including ledges, nest boxes, and hanging planters.

California Quail

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  • Scientific name: Callipepla californica
  • Lifespan: Up to 8 years
  • Size: Approximately 23-28 cm (9-11 inches)
  • Native to: Western North America

The California Quail (Callipepla californica) is a plump, ground-dwelling bird endemic to the western regions of North America, particularly California. It is characterized by its distinctive appearance, including a teardrop-shaped plume atop its head, a scaled pattern on its chest, and a black face with white markings. These quails are often seen in groups known as coveys, foraging for seeds, insects, and vegetation in a variety of habitats, including chaparral, woodlands, and grasslands.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

California Quails usually lay a clutch of 10 to 15 eggs. Their eggs are small and slightly pointed at one end. The eggshell color is typically pale cream or light brown, sometimes with speckles or blotches that provide some camouflage when they are placed in shallow ground nests, often concealed beneath vegetation.

Mistle Thrush

brown birds with white spots

  • Scientific name: Turdus viscivorus
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Size: 11 inches
  • Native to: Europe

The Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus) is a large, pale thrush species found primarily in Europe. It is known for its melodious and far-carrying song. Adult Mistle Thrushes have a pale gray-brown plumage with darker spots on their upperparts. They have a distinctive white belly with bold, dark speckles. These birds are often associated with wooded and forested habitats, where they forage for insects, berries, and fruits.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Mistle Thrushes typically lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. The eggs are small and smooth, with a pale blue or greenish-blue coloration. Their subtle egg color helps them blend into the forested environments where they build cup-shaped nests in trees, often in the vicinity of mistletoe, from which they get their name.

White Wagtail:

The White Wagtail (Motacilla alba) is a small and elegant passerine bird found across Europe and Asia. It is known for its striking black-and-white plumage and its characteristic habit of wagging its long tail up and down while foraging. Adult White Wagtails have a black crown, nape, wings, and tail, which contrasts sharply with their white face, throat, belly, and underparts. They are often seen near water bodies, such as rivers, lakes, and ponds.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

White Wagtails typically lay a clutch of 4 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually pale blue with fine speckles. These eggs are often laid in concealed nests among rocks or in crevices to provide some protection from potential predators.

Meadow Pipit:

The Meadow Pipit (Anthus pratensis) is a small, slender bird that inhabits open grasslands and meadows across Europe and Asia. It has cryptic brown plumage with streaked patterns on its upperparts and a pale belly. Meadow Pipits are often seen on the ground, hopping and running as they forage for insects and seeds. They are known for their high-pitched, tinkling call.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Meadow Pipits usually lay a clutch of 4 to 7 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. The eggshell color varies but is commonly pale blue or greenish-blue with fine speckles. These eggs are laid in shallow ground nests concealed in grassy areas, providing some camouflage.

Common Cuckoo:

The Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is a well-known and enigmatic bird famous for its unique reproductive strategy. It is a medium-sized bird with a slender body, long tail, and grayish-blue plumage on the upperparts and white underparts. Unlike many other birds, the Common Cuckoo does not build its own nest but rather lays its eggs in the nests of other bird species, known as host species. The cuckoo chick hatches first and often pushes the host’s eggs out of the nest, receiving care from the unwitting host parents.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Common Cuckoos do not lay their own eggs in their own nests. Instead, they lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species. The color of a Common Cuckoo egg can vary depending on the host species but is usually designed to mimic the host’s eggs, helping to ensure that the host parent incubates and raises the cuckoo chick.

House Wren

  • Scientific name: Troglodytes aedon
  • Lifespan: Typically 2-5 years
  • Size: Small wren; around 4-5 inches (10-13 cm) in length
  • Origin: Native to the Americas

The House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) is a small and active songbird found in the Americas. It is known for its bubbly and melodious song and its habit of nesting in various cavities, including birdhouses, tree crevices, and even outdoor structures. House Wrens have plain brown plumage with a slightly darker barred pattern on their wings and tails. They are often seen darting in and out of vegetation while foraging for insects.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

House Wrens typically lay a clutch of 5 to 8 eggs. The eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. They are usually white or creamy-white in color. The subtle egg color provides some camouflage when they are placed in the concealed nests they build, often in man-made structures or natural cavities.

Great Bustard:

The Great Bustard (Otis tarda) is a large, terrestrial bird native to Europe and Asia. It is one of the heaviest flying birds in the world. Adult males can weigh up to 18 kilograms and have a wingspan of around 2.4 meters. These birds have a distinctive appearance with brownish-gray plumage, a white belly, and a long neck. Adult males have a white neck and a striking black and white head pattern. They are often seen in grasslands and open agricultural areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Great Bustards typically lay a clutch of 1 to 4 eggs. The eggs are large, oval-shaped, and have a smooth texture. They are usually olive-brown or brownish-gray in color, which provides some camouflage when they are placed on the ground in shallow nest depressions within grassy habitats.

Common Redpolls

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  • Scientific name: Acanthis flammea
  • Life span: 2 to 3 years
  • Size: 4.5 and 5.5 in
  • Weight: 12 and 16 grams
  • Origin: southern Canada and the northern states

The Common Redpoll (Acanthis flammea) is a small finch that breeds in the northern regions of Europe, Asia, and North America. These birds are known for their distinctive red forehead patch and their habit of feeding on seeds, especially birch and alder seeds. They have brownish plumage with streaks, helping them blend into their preferred habitat of boreal forests and open woodland areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Common Redpolls typically lay a clutch of 2 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small, oval-shaped, and have a smooth texture. The eggshell color can vary but is often pale blue or greenish-blue with fine speckles or markings. These subtle colors help camouflage the eggs when they are placed in cup-shaped nests constructed in shrubs or trees.

Gray-Headed Swamphen:

The Gray-Headed Swamphen (Porphyrio poliocephalus) is a waterbird found in wetlands and marshy areas in parts of Asia and Australia. It is recognized by its striking appearance, including a vivid blue-purple body, a distinctive gray head, and a long, bright red bill. These birds are known for their strong and agile swimming abilities and their loud, raucous calls.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Gray-Headed Swamphens typically lay a clutch of 5 to 11 eggs. Their eggs are large, oval-shaped, and have a slightly rough texture. The eggshell color is usually pale cream or buff, sometimes with light brown speckles. These birds often build their nests in dense vegetation near water, where the subtle egg colors help them blend into their surroundings.

Prothonotary Warbler:

The Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) is a striking and colorful bird native to the eastern United States. It is known for its vibrant yellow plumage, which covers most of its body, and its distinctive black eye markings and bill. These warblers are often found in swampy or wooded habitats near water, where they forage for insects and spiders.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Prothonotary Warblers typically lay a clutch of 3 to 7 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped with a smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually white or creamy-white, which provides some contrast to their vibrant yellow plumage. They build their nests in tree cavities or nest boxes, often near water, where the subtle egg colors help them blend into their surroundings.

White-eyed Vireo:

The White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) is a small, energetic songbird found in the eastern and southern regions of North America. It is named for its distinctive white eye ring, which stands out against its olive-green upperparts and white underparts. White-eyed Vireos are known for their loud, repetitive songs and their preference for shrubby and brushy habitats.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

White-eyed Vireos typically lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly glossy texture. The eggshell color is usually white or creamy-white, which contrasts with the greenish vegetation where they build their cup-shaped nests.

Eastern Towhee

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  • Scientific name: Pipilo erythrophthalmus
  • Lifespan: Up to 9 years
  • Size: Approximately 20 centimeters (8 inches) in length
  • Origin: Native to eastern North America

The Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) is a distinctive and boldly marked bird found in eastern North America. Adult males have striking black plumage on their upperparts, including their head and throat, along with rufous sides and white belly. They are known for their “drink-your-tea” song, which sounds like they are saying their name. These birds forage on the ground, scratching through leaf litter for insects and seeds.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Eastern Towhees typically lay a clutch of 2 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly glossy texture. The eggshell color is usually pale green or bluish-green with speckles or markings that vary in color. These eggs are laid in concealed nests on or near the ground, often among thick vegetation, providing some camouflage.

Tufted Titmouse

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Baeolophus bicolor
  • Lifespan: 2.1 years
  • Size: 5.5–6.3 in
  • Native to: Nearctic region

The Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) is a small and lively bird commonly found in woodlands and suburban areas in eastern North America. It is recognized by its gray plumage, striking crest on its head, and its distinctive white underparts. Tufted Titmice are known for their acrobatic feeding behavior and their cheerful “peter-peter-peter” calls.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Tufted Titmice typically lay a clutch of 3 to 9 eggs. Their eggs are small, oval-shaped, and have a slightly smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually white or creamy-white, which contrasts with the gray and brown nest cavities where they build their nests. These birds often nest in tree holes or nest boxes.

Barn Swallow

bluebirds in Florida

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  • Scientific name: Hirundo rustica
  • Lifespan: 4 years
  • Size: 5.5 and 7 inches
  • Native to: Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas

The Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) is a graceful and agile bird known for its distinctive deeply forked tail and vibrant plumage. It has steel-blue upperparts, a cinnamon-colored throat and forehead, and white underparts. Barn Swallows are expert fliers, often seen swooping and gliding in pursuit of flying insects. They are widespread and can be found across the globe in a variety of habitats, including farms, barns, and open areas.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Barn Swallows typically lay a clutch of 3 to 7 eggs. Their eggs are small and elongated, with a smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually white or creamy-white with fine speckles or markings, often concentrated at the larger end of the egg. These subtle egg colors help camouflage them when they are placed in cup-shaped nests made of mud and lined with grass or feathers, often attached to structures like buildings or cliffs.

Brown-headed Cowbird

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  • Scientific name: Molothrus ater
  • Lifespan: 12 years
  • Size: 6.3–8.7 in
  • Native to: North America

The Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) is a unique bird known for its parasitic nesting behavior. These birds have striking sexual dimorphism, with males having glossy black plumage and a distinctive brown head, while females are dull gray-brown. Instead of building their own nests, female cowbirds lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, relying on these host species to raise their chicks.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Brown-headed Cowbirds do not build their own nests. Instead, they lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species. The color and pattern of cowbird eggs vary, but they often resemble the eggs of the host species. This allows the cowbird eggs to go unnoticed among the host’s own eggs. The host parent unknowingly incubates and raises the cowbird chick alongside its own offspring.

Black Skimmer:

The Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger) is a distinctive coastal bird known for its unique and striking bill. It has black upperparts, white underparts, and its most notable feature is its long, orange bill with a lower mandible longer than the upper. Black Skimmers are often seen flying low over the water, using their lower bill to skim the surface and catch small fish. They are found along coastal regions and sandy shores.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Black Skimmers typically lay a clutch of 3 to 5 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually pale buff or light brown with dark spots or blotches that provide some camouflage when they are laid in shallow scrapes in the sand. These nests are often located on sandy beaches or gravelly areas near water.

Turkey vulture

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  • Scientific name: Cathartes aura
  • Lifespan: Up to 20 years
  • Size: Approximately 64-81 centimeters (25-32 inches)
  • Origin: North and South America (found in regions such as the United States, Mexico, and Brazil)

The Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) is a large scavenging bird of prey found in the Americas. It is known for its distinctive appearance, with a bald, red head and a feathered, dark brown to black body. Turkey Vultures have long wings and a keen sense of smell, which they use to locate carrion from high in the sky. They play a crucial role in cleaning up the environment by feeding on carcasses.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Turkey Vultures typically lay a clutch of 1 to 3 eggs. Their eggs are large and oval-shaped, with a smooth texture. The eggshell color is typically creamy-white or pale buff, which contrasts with the dark nest sites they choose, often in caves, hollow trees, or abandoned buildings. These birds do not build traditional nests; instead, they lay their eggs on the ground or in simple scrapes.

Cliff Swallow

  • Scientific name: Petrochelidon pyrrhonota
  • Lifespan: Typically 2-3 years
  • Size: Small swallow; around 5.5-6.3 inches (14-16 cm) in length, wingspan of 11.4-12.2 inches (29-31 cm)
  • Origin: Native to North and Central America, often nesting on cliffs and structures.

The Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) is a small, social bird found in North America. It is known for its distinctive square-shaped tail and its habit of nesting on cliffs, bridges, and man-made structures. Cliff Swallows have a steel-blue back and a pale, buff-colored forehead and throat. They are highly gregarious, often nesting in colonies.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Cliff Swallows typically lay a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small, oval-shaped, and have a smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually white or creamy-white with fine speckles or markings, often concentrated at the larger end of the egg. These birds construct mud nests that are often gourd-shaped and attached to vertical surfaces. The subtle egg colors help camouflage them within the nest structure.

Killdeer

Small Brown Birds With Long Beaks

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  • Scientific name: Charadrius vociferus
  • Lifespan: Up to 10 years
  • Size: Approximately 23-28 cm (9-11 inches)
  • Native to: North and Central America
  • Beak length: Around 3-4 cm (1.2-1.6 inches)

The Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) is a medium-sized shorebird found throughout North America. It is known for its distinctive appearance and its unique “kill-dee” call. Killdeers have brownish-gray upperparts, a white belly, and two black bands across their chest. They also have striking orange-ringed eyes. Killdeers are often found in a variety of habitats, including fields, shorelines, and even parking lots, where they nest on the ground.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Killdeers typically lay a clutch of 4 eggs. Their eggs are small, oval-shaped, and have a smooth texture. The eggshell color is pale cream or buff with dark, irregular blotches and spots that provide excellent camouflage when they are placed in simple scrapes on the ground, often near gravel or rocks.

Northern cardinals

birds with red breast

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  • Scientific name: Cardinalis cardinalis
  • Life span: Up to 15 years
  • Size: 21 cm (8.3 in)
  • Weight: 33-65 g
  • Origin: Eastern and Central North America

The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a charismatic and colorful songbird found in eastern North America. It is known for its vibrant plumage, with males sporting bright red feathers and a distinctive crest, while females have more subdued brownish-red plumage. Cardinals are common backyard birds and are famous for their melodious songs.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Northern Cardinals typically lay a clutch of 2 to 5 eggs. Their eggs are small, oval-shaped, and have a slightly glossy texture. The eggshell color is pale greenish-blue or blue-green with speckles or markings, often concentrated at the larger end of the egg. These birds build cup-shaped nests in dense shrubs or trees, where the subtle egg colors help camouflage them.

American Golden Plover:

The American Golden Plover (Pluvialis dominica) is a migratory shorebird that breeds in the Arctic tundra of North America and winters in South America. During the breeding season, they have a striking black and gold plumage, while in their non-breeding plumage, they become more subdued. These birds are known for their long-distance migrations.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

American Golden Plovers typically lay a clutch of 4 eggs. Their eggs are small and pear-shaped, with a slightly grainy texture. The eggshell color varies but is usually pale brown with dark, irregular blotches and spots that provide excellent camouflage when they are placed in simple ground nests in the tundra.

Eastern Meadowlark:

The Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna) is a medium-sized songbird found in grasslands and meadows of eastern North America. It is known for its beautiful and melodious song, which is often heard during the breeding season. Eastern Meadowlarks have a streaked brown upperparts and a bright yellow belly with a distinct black V-shaped bib on their chest.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Eastern Meadowlarks typically lay a clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly glossy texture. The eggshell color is usually pale blue or greenish-blue with fine speckles or markings. These birds construct concealed nests on the ground in grassy habitats, where the subtle egg colors help provide camouflage.

Western Meadowlark

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  • Scientific name: Sturnella neglecta
  • Lifespan: Up to 6 years
  • Size: 20-28 centimeters (7.9-11 inches)
  • Origin: North America

The Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) is a medium-sized songbird found in western North America. It is known for its cheerful and melodious song, which is often associated with open grasslands and meadows. These birds have a striking appearance, featuring a bright yellow breast with a black V-shaped bib on their chest, along with brown and white streaked upperparts.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Western Meadowlarks typically lay a clutch of 2 to 7 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly glossy texture. The eggshell color is usually pale blue or greenish-blue with fine speckles or markings. These eggs are often laid in concealed nests in grassy habitats, providing some camouflage.

Red Knot:

The Red Knot (Calidris canutus) is a medium-sized shorebird known for its long-distance migrations. During the breeding season, they have a mottled reddish-brown plumage, while in their non-breeding plumage, they become more grayish and pale. Red Knots are often seen on coastal mudflats and sandy shores, where they forage for mollusks and other invertebrates.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Red Knots typically lay a clutch of 4 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly grainy texture. The eggshell color is typically pale greenish-brown with darker brown speckles and markings. These eggs are laid in shallow scrapes in the tundra or on sandy beaches, providing some camouflage in their respective habitats.

Red-Necked Phalarope:

The Red-Necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) is a small and elegant shorebird found in various parts of North America. It is known for its distinctive feeding behavior, where it swims in circles on the water’s surface, creating a whirlpool to bring small aquatic invertebrates to the surface. During the breeding season, males have striking reddish necks and black caps, while females have more subdued plumage.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Red-Necked Phalaropes typically lay a clutch of 3 to 4 eggs. Their eggs are small and pointed at one end, with a slightly smooth texture. The eggshell color varies, but it is often pale olive-brown or greenish-brown with irregular blotches or markings. These birds nest in wetland habitats, often in grassy or mossy areas near water, where the subtle egg colors provide some camouflage.

Blue Jay

bluebirds in Florida

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  • Scientific name: Cyanocitta cristata
  • Lifespan: about 7 years
  • Size: 9 and 12 inches
  • Native to: North America

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a striking and colorful songbird found in eastern North America. It is known for its distinctive blue plumage with white markings on its face and tail. Blue Jays also have a prominent crest on their heads. They are known for their loud and varied vocalizations, which include calls, squawks, and mimicry of other bird species.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Blue Jays typically lay a clutch of 2 to 7 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly smooth texture. The eggshell color is usually pale greenish-blue or greenish-gray with speckles or markings that vary in color. These eggs are laid in concealed cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs, where the subtle egg colors help camouflage them.

Osprey

birds with white heads

  • Scientific name: Pandion haliaetus
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Size: 20-inch
  • Native to: throughout the planet, except in Antarctica, Africa, and South America,

The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a large raptor found worldwide. It is known for its impressive fishing skills, as it primarily feeds on fish. Ospreys have dark brown upperparts, a white head and underparts, and distinctive dark eye patches. They are often seen near bodies of water, where they build large nests on platforms or structures.

Eggs and Egg Colors

Ospreys typically lay a clutch of 2 to 4 eggs. Their eggs are large and oval-shaped, with a slightly rough texture. The eggshell color is usually pale blue or bluish-white. These eggs are laid in large stick nests, often located on trees, cliffs, or man-made structures near water bodies. The subtle egg colors help blend them into the nest.

Cedar Waxwing

birds with crest

  • Scientific name: Bombycilla cedrorum
  • Lifespan: about 8 years
  • Size: 6-8 inches
  • Native to: Northern half of the United States

The Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) is a sleek and elegant songbird known for its silky, plumage and distinctive markings. It has soft, brownish-gray plumage, a black mask covering its eyes, and a bright yellow band at the tip of its tail. Cedar Waxwings are often seen in flocks, foraging for fruits, berries, and insects in trees and shrubs.

Eggs and Egg Colors:

Cedar Waxwings typically lay a clutch of 2 to 6 eggs. Their eggs are small and oval-shaped, with a slightly smooth texture. The eggshell color is pale blue or greenish-blue. These birds often build their nests in trees, where the subtle egg colors provide some camouflage amidst the foliage.

  1. European herring gull
  2. Winter wren
  3. Great tit
  4. Melodious Warblers
  5. Song thrush
  6. California gull
  7. Northern Mockingbird
  8. Varied thrush
  9. House finch
  10. California quail
  11. Mistle thrush
  12. White wagtail
  13. Meadow pipit
  14. Common Cuckoo
  15. House wren
  16. Great Bustard
  17. Common redpoll
  18. Gray headed swamphen
  19. Prothonotary Warbler
  20. White-eyed Vireo
  21. Eastern Towhee
  22. Tufted Titmouse
  23. Barn Swallow
  24. Brown-headed Cowbird
  25. Black Skimmer
  26. Turkey Vulture
  27. Western Meadowlark
  28. Cliff Swallow
  29. Killdeer
  30. Northern Cardinal
  31. American Golden Plover
  32. Eastern Meadowlark
  33. Western Meadowlark
  34. Red Knot
  35. Red-necked Phalarope
  36. Blue Jay
  37. Osprey
  38. Cedar Waxwing
I'm Nauman Afridi, the bird enthusiast behind Birdsology.com. My lifelong passion for birds has led me to create a space where fellow bird lovers can find valuable insights and tips on caring for our feathered friends. Professionally, I'm a brand strategist and digital marketing consultant, bringing a unique perspective to the world of bird care. Whether you're a novice or an experienced bird owner, Birdsology.com is designed to be a welcoming community for all. Feel free to explore, and reach out if you have any questions or just want to chat about birds.
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